Tuesday, April 29, 2008

Revolutionary War Pensions History

1. Grayson County Revolutionary War Pension Applications 1832 The following affadavits were extracted from the Grayson County Order Book for the months following the June 1832 change in the U.S. laws governing pension eligibility of Revolutionary War veterans. Those residents filing statements were: Samuel Ausburn Isaiah Austin Benjamin Beasly Stephen Clark William Cloud James Cox Dennis Fielder John Fielder John Frost John Jones James Mortimer Benjamin Phipps Burrell Spence Timothy Spencer Jonathan Thomas William Vaughan Apologies are hereby extended for any and all errors in transcription. ________________________________________________________________
"22 August 30th 1832 Virginia Grayson County Court On this 30th day of August 1832 personally appeared in open Court before the County Court of Grayson County now sitting Timothy Spencer, a resident of Grayson County and State of Virginia aged seventy four years or thereabouts, who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th 1832: That he entered the service of the United States he believes in the fall of the year 1776, being drafted under Capt Smith of Salem North Carolina, he then residing in the County of Surry North Carolina, and marched against the Cherokee Indians. He marched to the Cherokee Towns a distance of three hundred miles through the wilderness, and the army with which he marched destroyed the Towns and crops of the Indians, and retook a Mrs. Beane who had been captured by the Indians. He recollects well the meeting between Mrs. Beane and her two sons William and Robert, which was a very affecting one. On this expedition Col. Joseph Williams of Surry County North Carolina commanded the Regiment to which he was attached. He had a written discharge for this tour of duty which he has lost. He was three months in service on the tour. He afterwards year not recollected but several years after the above tour of duty, then living in what was then Henry now Patrick Cty Virginia enlisted or was drafted he is not positive which but believes enlisted for a tour of Eighteen months. He does not recollect which Capt he then served under, but recollects that first served under Col. Townshall of Henry County Virginia who gave him several furloughs all called for, the troops not being ready to march. He was then marched under a Lieutenant whose name he does not recollect to Hillsborough in North Carolina where he was put under the Command of Col Buford, but does not recollect the names of his company officers. He was during this tour about seven months in actual service and twelve months on Furlough all called for, which required him constantly to be ready to march. Some time after (time not recollected) he went as a substitute for one Benj. Thomas from the County of Surry North Carolina under Capt Scott on a eleven months tour, marched through N. Carolina beyond Salisbury, where he joined the command of Genl. Davidson. He was then ordered to take charge of a waggon to convey some wounded prisoners to Salisbury, promising him he should be discharged from his tour of duty upon performing that duty. When he arrived in Salisbury he was induced by Capt Alexander the Capt of the guard to go on with the prisoners to the tending ford of the Yadkin, where he was discharged by Capt Alexander, captain [page] 23 August 30th 1832 of the guard according to the promise of the General. He gave him a written discharge which is still preserved and forwarded with this Declaration. He states particularly that he did not enter the service on the last mentioned occasion as a waggoner, but on the march was ordered to drive a waggon which was without a driver. He has resided since the War a part of his time in the County of Montgomery Va and this became of his time in the now County of Grayson formerly a part of the County of Patrick Virginia. He has no other documentary evidence of his service than the discharge above mentioned, nor does he know of any living witness by which he can prove those services. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatsoever to a pension or currency except the Present, and declares that his name is not on the Pension roll of the agency of any state. Sworn to and subscribed this day and year aforesaid. Timothy Spencer, his mark And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion, after the investigation of the matter, and after putting the interrogatories Prescribed by the War Department, that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier, and served as he states. And the Court further certifies that it is proved to their satisfaction that the said applicant is a man of good character and worthy of credit, and that he cannot without much trouble and expence procure positive or traditional oral evidence of his service. The Discharge mentioned in the foregoing Declaration is as follows, Viz: This will certify that the bearer hereof Timothy Spencer was ordered by General Davidson to carry the wounded prisoners to Salisbury under my care, and that I was ordered by said General to discharge said Spencer and his waggon, and he and his waggon is accordingly discharged from the Public service. Given under my hand at Salisbury this 28th Jan. 1781. Jno NC[?] Alexander, Capt guard Absent William Clould Genl. Justice. Virginia Grayson County Court: On the 30th day of August 1832 personally appeared in open Court before the County County of Grayson now sitting William Clould a resident of the said County of Grayson and State of Virginia, aged Eighty two years, who being first duly [page] 24 August 30th 1832 sworn according to Law, doth on his oath make the following Declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States as a volunteer private soldier under Capt James Lyon in the fall of the year 1776 the Declarant then being a resident of the present County of Patrick Virginia, it then being the county of Henry. He marched in said company with an expedition commanded by Col Wm Christian of the County of Botetourt Virginia as the Declarant believes against the Cherokee towns, a distance of three hundred miles, through the wilderness. On this expedition many of the Indian Towns & crops were destroyed, and a Mrs. Beane who had been taken by the Indians was recovered and restored to her friends. The declarant does not recollect the precise time he was absent on this expedition, but supposes he was then in service at least three months. The declarant received no discharge for this tour; because of the provisions giving out in the wilderness on the return of the troops, they were directed to disperse and make their way home as they could. The hardships which he underwent in this expedition produced a fever on his return which confined him a long time, and was near proving fatal. Soon after he recovered his health sufficiently he was detached with about twenty others by the County Court of Henry (he then residing still in that County) on an expedition across the mountains as far as the Lead Mines now in Wythe County Virg[ini]a. The object of this expedition was to reconnoiter and obtain information of the proceedings of the tories and disaffected persons who at that time abounded in that section of the county. He & his party took one tory prisoner and delivered him to Col. Lynch who was then stationed at the Lead Mines for the purpose of keeping down the tories and disaffected. The Declarant thinks he was on this service between twenty & thirty days, and that it took place in the Spring or Summer of 1777. Soon after this he found the situation of his family so unsafe where he then resided in consequence of the depredations of the tories, and his frequent calls from home, that he removed them to the lower end of Henry County on Smiths river where he placed them among their friends. He was there appointed a Lieutenant under Capt John Pyrtle but not commissioned in consequence of the unsettled state of affairs. Being an expert woodsman, he was frequently detailed on short expeditions against the tories among the mountains who were exceeding troublesome. He remained about two months as Lieutenant under Capt Pyrtle during which time, altho. he was not constantly in actual service, his service was more harassing than a regular tour of duty would have been, as he was required to keep himself constantly ready for any call, and was [page] 25 August 30th 1832 frequently called upon so that he could not attend to his domestic matters to any advantage. He then left his family where he had placed them as above stated and returned to the upper end of the County where he had formerly resided in order to be nearer the scene of danger, and of action, and to render what service he could in keeping down the tories who almost overran the Southwestern frontier counties of Virginia and the adjacent Counties of Carolina. He was immediately appointed to Lieutenant under Capt Jonathan Hanby and was commissioned as such by the then Governor of Virginia. This Commission was burnt he believes among his other papers some years ago when his house was burnt. In this capacity he continued to serve until nearly the close the the war when he was promoted to the command of the said company. During the whole of this last mentioned period, he was a complete minute man, being constantly on the alert marching to & fro as occasion required, and being engaged in a number of short expeditions, which it is impossible for him to recollect in detail. He recollects particularly two expeditions rather longer than the others, one into Wilkes County N. Carolina against the tories and one to meet Gen Green in order to join his army, but before he could join the army Maj or Col. Lyon under whom he was a volunteer (tho'still holding the office of Lieutenant in Hanby's Company) got lame & returned with his company; upon which Maj Peter Hairston beat up for volunteers of which the Declarant was one and again attempted to join Green's army, but before that could be effected the Battle of Guilford was fought, and he returned to his command at home. During a considerable portion of the time that he was Lieutenant under Hanby, the said Hanby was in the Carolinas on a tour of duty, and the command of the Company with all its responsibility devolved on him. The declarant cannot ascertain the precise length of time he was in active service during the revolutionary War (The nature of his service renders it impossible that he should do so) But he can say and does say, that during the whole War, he was constantly either in actual service, or ready & liable to be engaged therein, and he believed that if he could ascertain the precise time of the actual service it would not fall short of two or three years. He further states that during the whole period of the War, his private affairs were almost entirely neglected, as he could not call one day his own. The declarant has no documentary evidence in his power to prove his service and the witness by whom he could prove it live in another County, are aged and inform, and their evidence cannot be procured without great trouble and expence. If however he can procure the [page] 26 August 30th 1832 affidavits of those persons in time he will do so & forward it with this Declaration. He lived in North Carolina near the line of his former residence, a short time after the close of the War. He removed to his present residence 35 years ago; it was then a part of Patrick County but has since been attached to the County of Grayson. He hereby relinquishes every claim to a Pension or annuity whatever except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State. Sworn to & subscribed the day & year aforesaid. Wm. Cloud We Samuel Ausburn residing in the County of Grayson Virg[ini]a and Timothy Spencer residing also in the said County of Grayson hereby certify that we are well acquainted with William Cloud who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration, that he is reputed and believed in the neighborhood where he resides, to have been a soldier or officer of the Revolution, and that we concur in that opinion. Sworn to and subscribed the day and yeare aforesaid. Timothy Spencer, his mark Sl. Ausburn And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion after the investigation of the matters, and putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department, that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier or officer and served as he states. And the Court further certifies that it appears to them that Samuel Ausburn and Timothy Spencer who have signed the preceeding certificate are residents in the County of Grayson and are credible persons and that their statement is entitled to credit, and that there is no Clergyman living in the neighborhood of the Applicant. Virginia Grayson County, to wit, On this 30th day of August 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the County Court of Grayson now sitting Benjamin Beasly a resident of the County of Grayson aforesaid, aged seventy years, who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States a year or two before the capture of Cornwallis, being then a resident of the County of King & Queen in the State of Virginia, under Capt John Pollard of the same county in regiment commanded by Col Lynes of the same county. He was drafted into the service and Marched to Williamsburg in Virginia, was in a Skirmish with the British in the county of Glasten near Little York. He served three months on this tour. He was again drafted some time after and marched under Capt James Fagg & Col Coleman both of [page] 27 August 30th 1832 King and Queen County of Virginia where he still resided to Hampton in Virginia & was in a skirmish with the British at that place. He served three months more on this tour. He was again drafted a short time before the capture of Cornwallis and marched under Capt Pollard again from the County of King & Queen where he still resided. He was at Little York during the whole siege of the place saw Genl. Washington when he arrived and took command and heard one particular order given by the General when the surrender took place, that the Americans should behave with moderation and not manifest any triumph. He saw General Lafayette at that place. He was not personally acquainted with any of the regular offices his acquaintance being confined principally to the Militia. He was three months on that tour. He has therefore served nine months in all during the revolutionary War. He cannot remember dates so as to tell the times when he was drafted exactly. He received no discharge after either tour, as the way in which the Militia to which he belonged was discharged was by the proclamation of the commanding officer. He has no documentary evidence of his services and no witness to prove them within his reach. He remained in King & Queen three years after the War, when he removed to Stokes County North Carolina where he resided until last year when he removed to Surry N. Carolina where he remained until last March when he removed to the County of Grayson Virginia where he now resides. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension list of the agency of any State. Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid. Benjamin Beasly, his mark And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion after the investigation of the matter, and after putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department, that the above named Benjamin Beasly was a Revolutionary soldier, and served as he states. And the Court further certifies that it is proved to their satisfaction that the said applicant is a man of good character and entirely worthy of credit. That having within a few months removed from the State of North Carolina to this county, that he cannot without great trouble and expence procure evidence either positive or traditionary of his revolutionary services. That there is no person residing in the county who can testify (owing to the cause above stated) to the fact that he is generally considered a Soldier of the Revolution. [page] 32 September 24th 1832 State of Virginia Grayson County On the 24th day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the Court of Grayson County now sitting, Benjamin Phipps, a resident of Grayson County in the State of Virginia aged 70 years, who being first duly sworn in according to Law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States after the happening of the following circumstances. He was living at the house of Capt. John Cox on New River in Montgomery County Virginia, now Grayson County Va, about the year 1779 or 80 engaged in making a crop of corn, when Col Roberts at the head of a company of tories, came there and made prisoners of himself, William Craig & Beverly Watkins, then said tories took the declarant and carried him to the British army commanded by Lord Roden. He remained with the said army, sick, at the time of the Battle of the Hangingsock, and when the said army marched toward Camden in South Carolina in order to give battle to Genl. Gates he run off from the British, and was making towards the residence of some of his relations in South Carolina when he fell in with a party of Ferguson's army who took him back and kept him a prisoner until they arrived with him at head quarters, very shortly afterwards he again made his escape and succeeded in getting to his relations in South Carolina and stayed there some time, while there he entered the American service as a volunteer under the command of Capt Anderson Thomas & Lieutenant Gullion, and while under these officers he made two or three excursions to the Congaree River, the dutch fork and to Orangeburgh, but was not in any battle during the time. The company in which the declarant was, chased a party of the enemy into their entrenchments at Orangeburgh South Carolina but did not attack them there. In the mean time a company of American horses came into the neighborhood and then declarant discovered that his horse was among them. He proved his property and the horse was given up. Capt Thomas then mounted him and went with the Company of horse, as he said, to the high hills of Santee & Monks corner in order to intercept [page] 33 September 24th 1832 a company of the enemy who were in that neighborhood, and the declarant was ordered by his Capt to go with the rest of the company under Capt Gullion and guard the boats on broad river in order to keep the enemy from crossing the river at that point. The declarant does not now recollect the length of time that he was in the Southern service, but he thinks it was not less than 6 months, and some part of that time he was under Col. Washington, and was upon one occasion employed in swimming his horses across the Congaree river some little time before the engagement with Tarleton. After this the declarant returned to New river in Grayson County after an absence of about 3 years, as near as can now be recollected. He afterwards was in an excursion against the tories in the mountains, under James Cox, who acted as Capt in place of his father, Capt John Cox, who was then absent on a tour against the Indians. In this excursion they came up with the tories, killed & wounded the whole party, except one who was the brother or Green then Commander & who afterwards joined the American Army as a regular soldier. The declarant will not say how long he was engaged in the United States service, in the whole for fear he might err as to the precise time, but he is confidant it was not less than six months. The Declarant was born in Guilford County in the state of North Carolina in the year 1761 or 2 as he believes but has no record of his age. He was in South Carolina when he entered the service, and since the revolutionary war he has lived in Grayson County Va. where he now lives. He has no documentary evidence to prove his services and never received any discharge from the services. He is known to James Cox a contemporary survivor and to Lewis Hail & Stephen Hail who can testify to his character for veracity and as to their belief of his services in the Revolutionary War. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the Present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State. Sworn to, and subscribed, this day & year aforesaid. Benjamin Phipps, his mark We Stephen Hail clergyman, residing in the county of Grayson, and Lewis Hail residing the same county, hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Benjamin Phipps who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration, that we believe him to be 70 years of age; that he is respected and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a soldier of the revolution, and that we concur in that opinion. [page] 34 September 24th 1832 Sworn & subscribed the day and yeare aforesaid. Stephen Hail Jr Lewis Hail And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion after the investigation of the matter, and after putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department, that the above named applicant was a revolutionary Soldier, and served as he states. And the Court further certifies that it appears to them that Stephen Hail, Jr who has signed the preceeding certificate, is a clergyman resident in the County of Grayson, and that Lewis Hail, who has also signed the same, is a resident in the County of Grayson and is a credible person, and that their statement is entitled to credit. State of Virginia County of Grayson On the 24th day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the Court of Grayson County now sitting Dennis Fielder a resident of Grayson County in the State of Virginia aged seventy six years, who being first duly sworn in according to Law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. This applicant says that he entered the service of the United States as a volunteer for three months under the command of Capt John Clark in the month of May 1776 or 77, as well as he now recollects, and marched to Petersburg in Virginia where he remained until his time of service expired. Col. George Walker had the command of the troops at Petersburg while this declarant was there. This declarant again volunteered his services for 3 months under the command of Capt of John Clark, and marched to Prince Edward Court house in the month of March of the same year of Lord Cornwallis' surrender at York Town in Virginia, where this declarant remained with others until his time of service again expired. The troops at Prince Edward Courthouse Va. was commanded by Col. John Halcomb or Holcome & this declarant with others was there guarding the Military stores at Prince Edward Courthouse Virginia. This declarant volunteered his services a third time for 3 months and marched from Prince Edward Courthouse in Virginia in the same year last aforesaid, under the command of Capt Richard Hallan, or Holland, with a number of British prisoners whom it was ordered should be taken to Winchester Va, but afterwards orders were given to March the said prisoners to the Barracks in Albemarle County Va., where they were taken, and delivered to Col Lindsay, and shortly afterwards the declarant was discharged & [page] 35 September 24th 1832 went home having served in the whole 9 months. This declarant resided in the County of Prince Edward in Virginia at the different times he volunteered, and continued to live in that County until the year 1789, when he removed to Grayson County, then Montgomery County, where he has resided ever since. This declarant was born in Goochland County, Virginia, 21st day of April in the year 1756, but has now no record of his age. He saw Baron Stuban and his forces pass Prince Edward Courthouse while he was stationed there, the Baron was then marching towards the South. This declarant never received any discharge from the services, his Captain told him he would give him one, if he would come for it, but this declarant never did apply for it because he supposed it would not be long before he would again be called into service, always holding himself ready to march whenever it was deemed necessary he should do so. This declarant in known to John Bird, Joshua Martin & Stephen Bourne in his present neighborhood who will testify to his character for veracity, and as to his service in the revolutionary War. He is also known to John Fielder, a contemporary survivor who knows that he did serve as is herein stated, and set forth. This declarant hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the Present, and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State. Sworn to and subscribed the day & year aforesaid. Dennis Fielder, his mark We Joshua Martin, residing the the county of Grayson, and John Bird, residing in the same County, hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Dennis Fielder, who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration, that we believe him to be 76 years of age, that he is reputed and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a soldier of the revolution & that we concur in that opinion. Sworn and subscribed the day & year aforesaid. John Martin John Byrd And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion, after the investigation of the matter, and after putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department, that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier and served as he states. And the Court further certifies that it appears to them that John Martin & John Byrd who have signed the preceeding certificate are residents of Grayson County and are credible persons and that their statement is entitled to credit. [page] 36 September 24th 1832 State of Virginia Grayson County On the 24th day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the Court of Grayson County now sitting William Vaughn a resident of Grayson County in the State of Virginia aged 71 years, who being first duly sworn in according to Law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States in the year before the battle of Guilford was fought, as a substitute for William Vaughn the elder and marched under a Capt from Hillsboro in North Carolina, whose name was Philip Webber of Goochland County Virginia and joined Genl. Stevens' division of Militia at, or near the same place. He remained at Hillsboro some time and then marched on through Guilford and Salisbury to Charlotte in North Carolina and then marched down the Peedee river and took up winter quarters near the Cheraw hills. He remained there until about the 8th day of Feby: of the year the battle of Guilford was fought and then marched to the old trading ford of the Yadkin river, where he & those with him came very nearly in contact with a part of Genl. Cornwallis' army having crossed the river late in the evening, and the enemy arriving there early in the same night, preparation was immediately made to give battle to the enemy, but they did not cross the river at that time, because they were attacked the same night by Morgan and his men, who after some severe fighting retreated, or at least the guns ceased firing. On the next day he was with those with him in sight of the enemy, and kept up a pretty smart fire during the day across the Yadkin. The most of the firing was done by a party of Catawba Indians who were friendly. From there he was marched by the aforesaid Capt Webber back through Guilford County and on to Pittsylvania old Courthouse and there discharged. The declarant does not now remember the precise time he was in the service, but is very certain it was 6 months, and perhaps more. He recollects that Genl. Green took the command of the troops while at, or near, Cheraw. He recollects of a Majr. Morris & Capt Thomas Gill who were officers in the same division of the army in which the declarant served. He recollects to have seen Genl. Gates at Hillsboro North Carolina, shortly after the battle of Guilford, the declarant was called into the Militia service under Capt Jeremiah Pate and marched through Salisbury & Charlotte to Windy river, a place then so called in the State of South Carolina, where he was constantly engaged in fighting the enemy for fifteen days and nights, with but little interruption. Genl. Green [page] 37 September 24th 1832 commanded the Americans at the time. He came with his company and remained with the other army until the whole American force retreated. This was what is called the siege of 96. He was then marched across broad river and taken out of his company for a waggon guard, and went down upon the waters near Camden. At this place his Capt dismissed him and all who were with him, but gave no written discharges. He had a discharge for the first term which is now lost. He served 3 months in the last tour, making his whole service 9 months. He was born in Hanover County Virginia in the year 1760 and has the record of his age now in his possession. He lived in Bedford County Va. when he entered the United States service, and has lived where he now does in Grayson County Va. since the revolution. He was a substitute aforesaid the first time and the second time he served in a Militia Company called regularly into the service. He has no documentary evidence of his services. He is known to John Fielder and Dennis Fielder contemporary survivors who can testify as to his character for veracity and their belief of his services as a soldier in the revolution. Sworn to, and subscribed, the day & year aforesaid. W. Vaughan We John Fielder and Dennis Fielder residing in Grayson County hereby certify that we are well acquainted with William Vaughan, who has subscribed & sworn to the above declaration, that we believe him to be 71 years of age, that he is respected and believed in the neighborhood where he resides, to have been a soldier of the revolution, and that we concur in that opinion. Sworn, and subscribed the day & year aforesaid. John Fielder Denes Fielder, his mark And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion, after the investigation of the matter, and after putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department, that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier and served as he states. And the Court further certifies that it appears to them that John Fielder and Dennis Fielder who have signed the preceeding certificate are residents in the county of Grayson and are credible persons and that their statement is entitled to credit. [page] 38 September 24th 1832 State of Virginia Grayson County On the 24th day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the Court of Grayson County now sitting Stephen Clark a resident of Grayson County in the State of Virginia aged 70 years, who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers, and served as herein stated. When the prisoners taken from Genl. Burgoyns were stationed in Albemarle County Virginia, Col. Taylor and Majr Robbarts, or Roberts, was there guarding the prisoners with regular soldiers, but it was said there were not enough of regular troops to guard them, and orders were given to take the nearest Militia as assistant guards. The declarant then residing in the County of Goochland Virginia was called upon to assist guard the said prisoners, and accordingly marched to Albemarle Barracks under the command of Capt Edward Creed of the aforesaid County of Goochland, and remained there 21 days, when he was discharged, he does not recollect the month or year of this first tour. He knew Capt Burlay & Capt Rice of the Regular army who were at the Albemarle barracks at the above mentioned period shortly after this tour the declarant marched again to the same place under the command of Capt Gideon Gaither [?] and continued guarding prisoners there another term of 21 days. The declarant belonged to the 10th division of the Goochland Militia, and drafted as such in his turn, both of the tories aforesaid. After this he served under Capt Samuel Price in a Regiment commanded by Col. Lewis, a tour of 3 months as a substitute for a man by the name of Ball; during this tour he was sometimes at Charles City Courthouse & at Hales forge and was dismissed at the Morban or Marban hills. A few days before he marched by Charles City Courthouse some of the American Militia men were surprised & cut to pieces by the British horse. Not long after the declarant was dismissed as above mentioned, he understood that Charleston was besieged and that a call was made for men from Virginia to march to the South, he immediately entered the service again, and marched into South Carolina by way of Hillsborough, North Carolina under the command of Capt Edmund Card [?], Francis Phillips, Lieutenant, and as well as he now recollect Bobt Bendshaw ensign, before he had got out of Virginia it was understood Chareston was in the possession of the enemy, and the company in which the declarant was went on and joined Genl. Gates at Rugaleys or Rudgaleys [page] 39 September 24th 1832 in South Carolina. Genl. Gates as soon as he was reinforced intended to fortify himself at a point on Craney creek and immediately proceeded to carry his intentions into execution, but before Genl. Gates and the army had gone a distance of more than about 6 or 7 miles, the infantry under Col. Porterfield were met and attacked by the enemy under Cornwallis, the fight was kept up at intervals through the night, and became general about sun rise or a little after that time, and resulted in the defeat of the Americans. The declarant recollects that after firing several rounds the Militia were breaking on his right and left, and in the retreat he heard Majr Nathaniel Gellorris, who was from Goochland Va. say "give them another fire", which was done, & then there was a general retreat. Col Porterfield he believes was wounded in the engagement. This was the battle at Camden, or Gates' defeat. He returned to Hillsborough in the State of North Carolina, and from there marched to a placed called New Gardens & remained there for some time, afterwards was marched to Guilford Courthouse and there discharged by Majr Morris. The declarant got home in the month of October, as well as he now recollects, of the year of Gates' defeat, having served a tour of 5 months, or upwards. Shortly after he returned from the South he again entered the service under the command of Capt. Elisha Leak as a substitute for Richard Pleasants and served 3 months chiefly in the county of Henrico Virginia. After this he again served a tour of 3 months in Henrico County Virginia as a substitute for Benjamin Watkins, under Capt. Gideon Hatcher of Goochland Va. & John Pleasants of Henrico Co Va. was his Col. After this time he again marched as a substitute for Benjamin Woolion under the command of Capt Richardson, who was commanded by Col. Charles Fleming, and served 3 months more, mostly in Henrico County Va. He again marched under the command of Elisha Leak Capt; William McCall and Anderson Pear[?] Lieutenant and Ensign, to the town of Winchester in Virginia, with prisoners and was in the service this time 3 months, as a substitute of Thomas Underwood. He again went as a substitute for George Slaughter, and served 6 months, was at York town when Cornwallis surrendered, was there under Col. Charles Dubury & Capt Frank Woodson. He saw Genl. Washington, Marlsburgh, La Fayette & Knox at York town; from York town he went to Hampton, from there to Portsmouth where he was taken sick & put in the Hospital under the care Doctr Broddy, and upon his recovery was discharged & went back into Goochland County having served altogether 26 months & 42 days. The declarant [page] 40 September 24th 1832 was born in the said county of Goochland in the year 1762 where he resided until the year 1805 when he removed to the County of Grayson where he now lives. He has no record of his age. He has two written discharges, one of which he received after he left Genl. Gates' army and the other after the surrender of Lord Cornwallis, both of which is now lost or mislaid so that they cannot [sic] The declarant cannot at this day recollect the years in which he served but recollect that he served all the different times above stated. The declarant is known in his present neighborhood to John Fielder a co[n]temporary survivor and to Lewis Hail, William Hail, Francis Hail & Stephen Hail who will testify as to his character for veracity and as to their belief of his services in the War of the Revolution. The declarant hereby relinquishes every claim whatsoever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State. Sworn to and subscribed the day and yeare aforesaid. Stephen Clarke We Stephen Hail a Clergyman residing in the County of Grayson and John Fielder residing in the same County herby certify that we are well acquainted with Stephen Clarke who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration: that we believe him to be seventy years of age, that he is respected and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a soldier of the Revolution, and that we concur in that opinion. Sworn and subscribed the day and year aforesaid. Stephen Hail Jr John Fielder State of Virginia Grayson County On this 24th day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the Court of Grayson County now sitting John Frost a resident of Grayson County in the State of Virginia aged 76 years, who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States in a militia Company of the State of New Jersey, a short time previous to the battle of long Island, he does not now recollect the year, nor does he recollect the name of his Captain he served in that Company 3 months and then delivered by another Company, he then enlisted for 3 months, and marched to Elizabeth town and remained upon the frontiers of the State of New Jersey until his term of service expired when he was discharged by his Capt, which discharge is now lost, he does not recollect the names of the officers whom he served under in this town. [page] 41 September 24th 1832 He then enlisted for 3 years under a recruiting officer by the name of Morrison as well as he now remembers. He joined the 4th Jersey Regiment and afterwards belonged to the 1st Jersey Regiment in which he was under a Capt. Mitchell, when discharged he was at the head of Elk when the Brittish first landed and had a fire or two at them there. He was afterwards in the battle of Brandywine and fought in the division commanded by General Starling & Genl. Maxwell. He recollects that in this battle the British attempted to cross the Brandywine at a point higher up than where he was but this movement was discovered, and severe Conflict took place between them and the americans as they crossed that Stream. He was also in the battle of Germantown & fought in the same division, as well as he recollects. He remembers that he marched nearly all night and reached Germantown very early in the morning. He also remembers that it was said that Americans had more prisoners than they had men, and one of the Genls. who was to have joined them at Germantown drank too much, as it was said, and in consequence of the misconduct of that officer, it was said, the battle was lost. He after this was taken sick with what was called the camp fever, but when Genl. Washington followed the enemy after they left Philadelphia, he joined his company and marched some distance into the State of new Jersey where he was again taken sick and himself with others who had the fever lay in Provincetown when the battle of Monmouth was fought. He was with many other sick removed to a place called Sourland[?], the name of his principal Doctor was Blomfield, or Bloomfield. When he recovered he followed and joined the army at Elizabethtown in New Jersy. He then went into the State of Pennsylvania and joined a Company at Beauford for 9 months against the Indians under Capt. John Morris. He then heard there was like to be a meeting in the American Army on account of those who had enlisted for 3 years not obtaining their discharge at the expiration of that time, and he immediately returned into the State of New Jersy and there received his discharge which is long since lost. He lay one winter at the Valley Forge in Pennsylvania and was frequently one of General Washington's guards. He served after he had enlisted for 3 years, 9 months over his time, which made his total service in the war of the revolution 5 years, 3 years & 9 months of which time he acted as corporal in his company. He was born in the year 1856 [sic] in Morris County New Jersey. He has now no record of his age, he lived in Morris County New Jersey at the time he entered the service and after the war of the Revolution he removed into the State of [page] 42 September 24th 1832 North Carolina where he lived about 18 months, he then removed into Montgomery County Virginia now no surviving witness who can testify as to his service, Grayson County where he now resides. [sic] He is known to James Cox, Col. Martin Dickenson and Amos Ballard of his neighbourhood, who can testify to his Character for Veracity, and as to their belief of his service in the War of the Revolution. He hereby relinquishes every Claim whatsoever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State. Sworn to & subscribed the day and year aforesaid. [no signature indicated] We Martin Dickenson and James Cox residing in the County of Grayson & State of Virginia, hereby certify that we are well acquainted with John Frost who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration, that we believe him to be 76 years of age, that he is respected and believed in the neighbourhood where he resides to have been a Souldier of the revolution, and that we concur in that opinion; sworn and subscribed the day and year aforesaid. M. Dickenson James Cox State of Virginia Grayson County On this 24th day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the Court of Grayson now sitting John Fielder a resident of Grayson County and State of Virginia aged 80 years, who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States in the year 1775 or 76, that he was drafted into the Militia & went out under the command of Cat. John Clark, McNeal was the lieutenant. He marched under the referenced officers to the Town of Petersburgh in Virginia when a Mr. Green procured a man to serve in his place, & then this declarant went home after being out about two weeks. His Capt did not wish him to go, because he [page] 43 September 24th 1832 had made this declarant his orderly Sergeant, but at last agreed to the exchange and this declarant went home. This declarant very shortly afterwards went out again, as a volunteer, under the Command of Capt Thos. Moore, and served 3 months at Petersburgh, Va. Col John Holcome & Col. Mead had the command at that time of the troops at Petersburgh. Major Spencer from Charlotte County Va was also there during the time this Declarant was in that Service. This declarant had a discharge from Capt Moore at the expiration of his 3 months tour which is now lost or mislaid. The declarant from the time that Capt Moore discharged him was continually in the service, sometimes at one place and then at another, until he was ordered by Col. Walker to take charge of 18 Waggons loaded with provision and take them to Genl. Green whose head quarters was then at Col. Ramsey on deep River, in North Carolina. This declarant had to press men to go with him and the waggons, and after encountering many difficulties from the tories, he arrived at last with the aforesaid provisions at Genl. Greens head quarters and delivered the same to Genl. Robert Lawson. This declarant was then directed by Genl. Lawson to raise a company and take the command of the same, and this declarant in a very short time raised a Company of 33 men and remained with Genl. Green until he and his men were discharged together with the whole of Genl. Lawsons brigade. This declarant then came on with Genl. Lawson to Dan River and was there discharged by Genl. Lawson and went home. This declarant does not recollect the precise time he was absent in North Carolina, but he does recollect that Genl. Lawson told him he should be allowed for a 3 months tour. Genl. Lawson signed the declarants last discharge which is now also lost. He can safely say that he served at least 12 months. This declarant was born in Goochland County Virginia in the year 1752. He had a record of his age in a large bible which was sold by the Sheriff for debt, and he is now unable to produce it. This declarant lived in Prince Edward County Va. at the different times when he went into the service, where he continued to reside until the year 1791 when he removed to the County of Grayson, then Wythe County, where he has resided ever since. This Declarant is known to Dennis Fielder & Stephen Clark contemporary survivors and also to James Cox in his present neighborhood who will testify to his character of veracity and their belief of his service in the War of the revolution. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension of roll of the agency of any State. [page] 44 September 24th 1832 Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid. John Fielder We Stephen Clark, residing in the County of Grayson and Dennis Fielder residing the the same County hereby Certify that we are well acquainted with John Fielder who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration, that we believe him to be 80 years of age; that he is respected and believed in the neighborhood where he resides, to have bee a soldier of the revolution, and that we concur in that opinion the fact being known to us personally. Sworn, and subscribed, the day & year aforesaid. Dennis Fielder, his mark Stephen Clark And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion after the investigation of the matter, and after putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department, that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier, and served as he states. And this Court further certifies, that it appears to them that Dennis Fielder and Stephen Clark who have signed the preceeding certificate are residents in the County of Grayson and are credible persons, and their statement is entitled to credit. State of Virginia Grayson County On this 24th day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the Court of Grayson now sitting Isaiah Austin a resident of Grayson County in the State of Virginia aged 73 years, who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States on the 5th of June 1766 [sic] and served a tour of 3 months under the command of Capt James Shepherd, Lieutenant Edmund Kirby and Ensign James Williams as an Indian Spy. On the first of June following he was again called on and served another tour of 3 months against the Indians under the command of Capt William Hardin & the aforesaid Lieutenant & Ensign. In the summer of 1778 he again entered the service against the Indians and served a tour of 3 months under Capt John Cox, Lieutenant William Craig who was afterwards killed & Ensign Alexander Henderson. In this company he marched to the long Island of Holston river, and then as far as the Cumberland Mountains in pursuit of the Indians. In this expedition Col Shelby was the commander and on our march Col Shelby divided his men into two companies or divisions for the purpose of hunting and overtaking the celebrated indian Chief called Dragon Canoe who with a party refused to come in and deal with [page] 45 September 24th 1832 the whites. The division in which the declarant was did not come up with the Indians, the other division however did overtake them and in a skirmish killed two. One of the whites was wounded but none killed. He then returned to the long Islands of Holston and remained there until his term of service expired. He was engaged in the service altogether 9 months. He has no discharge or other documentary evidence of his service. He was born on the 18th Feby 1759. He has now no record of his age, it was burned in his fathers house together with every thing else in it. He lived in Surry County North Carolina when he entered the service and since the revolution he has lived where he now does in the County of Grayson, formerly Montgomery County Virginia. He was a volunteer during the whole time of his service. He is known to James Cox and Benjamin Phipps contemporary survivors who an testify to his character for veracity and their knowledge of his service in the Indian War. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State. Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid. Isaiah Austin, his mark We James Cox and Benjamin Phipps residing in Grayson County hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Isaiah Austin, who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration, that we believe him to be 73 years of age, that he is respected and believed in the neighborhood where he lives to have been a soldier of the revolution and that we concur in that opinion. Sworn, and subscribed the day & year aforesaid. James Cox Benjamin Phipps, his mark And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion after the investigation of the matter and after putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department, that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier and served as he states. And the Court further certifies that it appears to them that James Cox & Benjamin Phipps who have signed the preceeding certificate are residents in the County of Grayson and are credible persons, and that their statement is entitled to credit. State of Virginia Grayson County On this 24th day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the Court of Grayson now sitting James Cox a resident of Grayson County & State of Virginia aged 69 years & 7 months, who being first duly [page] 46 September 24th 1832 sworn according to Law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under Capt John Cox at the age of 15 or 16 and assisted in building a fort on New River, near the mouth of Peach Bottom Creek, in the year 1778 and from that time until the year 1780 he acted as an Indian Spy for the said Capt John Cox, and from his intimate knowledge of the country, was upon every occasion sent as a pilot to conduct those who were unacquainted with the mountains, in safety to where the different parties had their encampments. The tories about this time or about the time the British were invading North & South Carolina, became very troublesome in the county where he was (having but very few neighbours who were not tories) and those, with those of the adjoining State of North Carolina, would frequently assemble themselves & overrun the country. The declarants father, the aforesaid Capt John Cox, Enoch Osborne & his family, Benjamin Phipps, Peter Houk, & William Hardin were the only whigs who would render any assistance when required. In this situation, surrounded by tories, the declarant and a few others had to combat the whole neighbourhood, and when they found themselves too weak, declarant was sent as an express [?] to Col. Benjamin Cleveland who was stationed on the Yadkin River near where the town of Wilksboro has been since built, to inform him of the fact that the tories were collecting in large bodies in the mountains shortly after his return from Col. Clevelands camp he was taken prisoner by the tories who intended to take & deliver him to the British, but in the mean time Col. Cleveland and Majr Jone [?] had joined their forces and overtook the tories at a place called the big Glade, now in Grayson County Va. The tories when they discovered the whigs determined to seek safety by flight and in their terror forgot the declarant who availed himself of the opportunity and immediately run with all speed to the whigs and informed them of what the tories had done, the whigs then pursued them, wounded some and took others prisoners whip'd or flogged several severely, & hanged one man where the declarant now lives. After this the declarants father Capt John Cox being on an expedition against the Indians, the tories under a Capt. Green made another ascension into the mountains and the declarant raised his fathers company and pursued the tories under Green, & killed & made prisoners of Green & his entire company. Green afterwards died of his wounds, and only one of the said company survived; this was a brother of the said Green, who afterwards enlisted in the Regular army of the United States. Sometime after this affair, a certain Capt. Roberts, of the tory party, came into the neighborhood with a company of Six Hessians, and this declarant with Majr [page] 47 September 24th 1832 Love pursued them into Carolina near the head of new River, determined to overtake them, but Capt Baker of North Carolina had heard of them, got in before the declarant & his party, overtook, killed & wounded the whole party except Roberts, their Capt, who made his escape. This declarant does not now recollect the precise time he was engaged in the War of the revolution, but he is very certain that he served under his father Capt. John Cox, and Majr William Love, as an Indian Spy, for the term of 2 years and that he was engaged under the same officers, against the tories for 2 years more making in all 4 years service. This applicant was born in Fort Chisal [Chiswell], in the County of Wythe then Botetourt & afterwards Montgomery County Feby 24th 1763. He has a record of his age in a large family bible which was given to the declarant by his father. He lived in Montgomery County Virginia when he entered the service, now Grayson County Virginia where he has lived ever since the War of the revolution, and where he now lives. He was a volunteer during the whole service. There was no regular officers in the neighborhood. He never had any discharge, indeed his only wish was to conquer & subdue the enemys of his country. He is known to Benjamin Phipps & Isaiah Austin contemporary survivors and to John Jones & Charles Cole, who can certify to his character for veracity, and as to their belief of his services in the War of the Revolution. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State. Sworn to & subscribed the day & year aforesaid. James Cox. We Benjamin Phipps residing in the County of Grayson and Charles Cole residing the same County, hereby Certify that we are well acquainted with James Cox, who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration, that we believe him to be 79 [sic] years & 7 months of age; that he is reputed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a soldier of the revolution, and that we concur in that opinion. Sworn, and subscribed, the day & year aforesaid. Benjamin Phipps, his mark Charles Cole And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion, after the investigation of the matter, and after putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department, that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier and served as he states. And the Court further certifies that it appears to them that Benjamin Phipps and Charles Cole who have signed the preceeding certificate, are [page] 48 September 24th 1832 residents of Grayson County Virginia, that they are credible persons, and that their statement is entitled to credit. County of Grayson State Virginia On this 24th day of September in the year of our Lord 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the County Court now sitting John Jones a resident of the county aforesaid in the State of Virginia of the age of 86 years the 3d. day of April 1832 who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he Inlisted the service of the United States and entered the service under the listing master Andrew Armstrong he saith he cant recollect the day or month but it was in the year 76 when the claimant entered the service and in a short time he substituted Elijah Abbott to serve in his place in the United States service which was record by Col. Martin Armstrong of Surry County in the State of North Carolina which discharged him and he was in no engagement he had not the opportunity of knowing the Officers as for the Regiment it was sent out he resided in Henry County in State Va. when he entered the service he was Inlisted the second tower entered a volunteer under Capt William Hardin for one month about the Blue Ridge after the torys then discharged then volunteer under Capt Jacob Stephenson one month and 13 days and was marched through the Big _anly country after the Indians which officers was militia and further says he has no documentry evidence and that he nows of no person whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his service I hereby relinquish every clame whatsoever to a Pension or annuity except the Present and declare that my name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State. Questioned by Court 1. whare was you born and in what year? he saith my parents toald me I was born in Moris County East Jersey in the year 1746 2. have you any record of your age and if so where is it? he saith I have in Bible at Isaac Branscoms 3. whare ware you living when called into service, where have you lived since the revolution War and where do you now live; he answereth in Henry County Va. when called into service and after the revolution War and now live in Grayson County in State of Virginia 4. how were you called into service; he said first Inlisted _____ and 3 times volunteered 5. State the names of some of the Regular officers who ware with the troops where you served, such Continental and Militia Regiments as you can recollect and the general circumstances of your service he saith I now none particular but two Capt William Handin Jacob Stephenson except the listing master A. Armstrong Ridgement was sixt no not the division. 6 did you ever receive a discharge from the service if by whom it was given [page] 49 September 24th 1832 what has become of it he saith I reved three discharges 1st by Col Martin Armstrong, 2d by Capt William Hardin, 3d by Capt Jacob Stepheson, further saith he lost his pocket book and all his discharges 7. State the names of persons to whom you are nown in your present neighbourhood and who can testify as to your character for veracity and good behaviour and your services as a soldier of the revolution. He saith Erwin Montgomery Esq John Cock Esq who acquainted with me as for any persons to prove my service I no not. John Jones, his mark We Irwin Montgomery and John Cock Clergyman residing in the neighbourhood hereby certify that we are well acquainted with John Jones which has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration, that we believe him to be 86 years of age that he is reputed and believed in the neighbourhood where he resides to have been a soldier of the revolution, and we concur in that opinion. Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid. Irwin Montgomery John Cock And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion after the investigations of the matter and after putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department, that the above named applicant was a revolutionary solder and served as he states. And the Court further certifies that it appears to them that Irwin Montgomery and John Cock who have signed the preceeding certificate are Clergymen, residing in the County of Grayson and are credible persons, and that their statement is entitled to credit. County of Grayson State Virginia On this 24th day of September in the year of our Lord 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the County Court now sitting Burrell Spence a resident of the County of Grayson in State of Virginia of the age of 69 years as near as he can recollect, who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers Alexander Gordan Capt and Colo Malbry and Colo Francis Lock and he served three months under some of said officers and general Green Colo Lee so called he saith it was in the year 1781 on the 2d day of August when the claimant entered the service and was discharged on the 27th day of October 1781 from the first [page] 50 September 24th 1832 tower in one engagement in South Carolina at the Eutaw Springs he was in the militia service under above named officers which was malitia and raised in the state of North Carolina in Surry County when he entered the service and further saith he was drafted and was in a battle at the sd. Eutaw Springs which he was ingadge then marched through the state of North Carolina as for the names of the reglar officers he knows not for he was under Capt Alexander Gordon Colo Colo Malbry General Green Lee an officer in time of battle at the sd. Springs when we war oblidge to retreat the sd. Lee commanded us to follow him which we did and he entered the service of the United States the second time on 2d day of May in the year 1782 he resided in the State of Virginia Montgomery County when he entered the service he was drafted; he was in Military service and was march through to the bed of Clinch River to Whitin Station and was in no engadgement the last tower and he has documentry evidence and that knows of no person whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his service. I hereby relinquish every claime whatsoever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declare that my name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State. Questioned by the Court 1: Where and what year were you born, he answers my parents tell me I was born in Bedford County in State Virginia, the year he now not. 2. Have you any record of your age, he saith not 3. Where ware you living when called into service, where have you lived since the revolution War and where do you now live, he saith in the State of North Carolina Surry County when I first entered the service, second tower I lived in State of Virginia in Montgomery then lived in North Carolina in Ash County then moved to State of Virginia in Grayson County and now resides in the same. 4. How ware you called into service ware you draftee or volunteer, he answereth I was drafted boath towers. 5. State names of some of the Regular officers who was with the troop such continental officers who was with the troops such continental and Militia Ridgements as you can recollect and the general circumstances, he says as for the regular officers he nows not, the officers which he nowd was Cp Gordon Colo Lock Col Malgry Lee General Green which officers part was in Battle at Eutaw Springs in South Carolina as for the Ridgement I now not. 6. Did you ever receive a discharge and by whom was it given, if so, what has become of it, he said I received two discharges 1st from Cpt Alexander Gordon and Col. Francis Lock; 2d from John Taylor Discharged from Capt Wards camp which discharge is produced in this court 1st in the letters and figures to wit, Camp at Bill Branch October 27th 1781 this [page] 51 September 24th 1832 may certify that Burrell Spence has served a three month tower of duty in my camp under the command of Col Lock as a good and faithful soldier and are hereby discharged. Second discharge Alexander Gordon Cpt Montgomery Francis Lock Colo I do hereby discharge Burrell Spence from Cp Wards Camp Militia he having served the tower for which he was drafted and during which time he behaved himself well. Witness my hand this 1st June 1782. Jno. Taylor State the names of persons to whom you are known in your present neighbourhood and who can testify as to your character for veracity and good behaviour your services as to a soldier of the revolution, he saith John Cock Esq Irwin Montgomery Esq is acquainted with him in my present neighbourhood as my service I now of no one to prove it by. Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid. Burrell Spence, his mark We Irwin Montgomery and John Cock Clergymen residing in the neighbourhood hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Burrell Spence which has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration that we believe him to be 69 years of age that he is reputed and believed in the neighbourhood where he resides to have been a soldier of the revolution and we concur in that opinion. Sworn to, and Subscribed the day and year aforesaid. Irwin Montgomery John Cock And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion, after the investigation of the matter, and after putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department, that the above named applicant was a revolutionary Soldier, and served as he States. And the Court further certifies, that it appears to them, that Irwin Montgomery and John Cock who have signed the preceeding certificate are Clergymen residing in the County of Grayson, and are credible persons, and that their statement is entitled to credit. Present, Abner Jones, James Anderson Sr., Churchill Jones, Benjamin Cooley, James Anderson Jr., William Vaughn and Irwin Montgomery, Gent Justices. [page] 53 October 22d 1832 State of Virginia Grayson County On this 22nd day of October in the year of our Lord 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the County Court of Grayson now sitting, John Comer a resident of Grayson County in the State of Virginia, aged 79 years who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under a Capt Lewis Jones of Amelia County in the State of Virginia, as a Malitia man, who were called minute men, and marched under the command of the aforesaid Capt Lewis Jones to Norfolk, in Virginia, and arrived there on New years day in the evening, the same night the town was set on fire by the British, but this declarant does not now recollect the year; James Foster and Robert Foster were his first and second Lieutenants, after the British had fired Norfolk this declarant was marched about 10 miles from that place, to a point at or near Rarsniss [?] landing, then so called, where he remained until the month of May following, having been in the [page] 54 October 22d 1832 Survis under the aforesaid Capt Jones about 6 months. This declarant then went unto the Marine Service under a Capt Hanway or Hanby and was sent to a place on James river called Sandy point where he remained waiting for a galley some short time and so soon as it arrived he went on board and sailed to old James town. The galley was commanded by Capt. John Colvert. This declarant was in the Marine Service about 3 months as well as he now remembers under the said Hanway & Calvert. He was afterwards in the same Service under Capt. Pollard and Lieutenant Stratten in a galley called the hero, commanded by a Capt. Marter. This declarant was a midshipman on board of this galley for a bout 6 months, having Served in it 12 months altogether. He left the aforesaid galley in September 1777 and in the year following he went as a seaman on board a New vessel built at Gasport & commanded by a Capt. Unrew and Lieutenant Strattaver but just before she sailed he was taken sick and did not accompany the vessel. After this he was 3 months in the Service of a merchant Mill, making folour for the army. This mill was in Amelia County Virginia & belongs to two Gentlemen by name of Coke. After he left the aforesaid Mill he again entered the U States Service under a Capt. Fulks and served 4 months the whole company were discharged Shortly after the surrender of Cornwallis, this declarant having served 2 years & 4 months, in the whole as a Soldier in the war of the Revolution. This declarant was born in Caroline County Virginia in July 1753. He has now no record of his age. He resided in Amelia County Virginia when he entered the service, and continued to reside in that County until he removed to Grayson County Virginia about 40 years ago, where he now lives. He was drafted as a militia man, except when he was in the marine service, & then he was a volunteer. He was acquainted with several of the regular officers, but has now forgotten their names. He never received a written discharge, and nows of no surviving witness who can testify to his service in the war of the revolution, but he is known to Stephen Hail and James Brewer in his present neighbourhood, who can testify as to his character for veracity and their belief of his service in the war of the revolution. He hereby relinquishes every claim to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State. Sworn to, and subscribed, the day and year aforesaid. John Comer We Stephen Hail Clergyman residing in the County of Grayson & James Brewer residing in the same County, hereby certify that we are well acquainted with John Comer who has sworn to and subscribed to the above declaration: that we believe him to be 79 years of age, that he is reputed and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a souldier of the revolution & that we concur with that opinion. [page] 55 October 22d 1832 Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid. Stephen Hail Jr. James Brewer And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion after the investigation of the matter and after putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department that the above named applicant was a revolutionary Soldier and served as he States. And the Court further certifies that it appears to them that Stephen Hail Jr who has signed the preceding certificate is a Clergyman resident in the County of Grayson, and that James Brewer who has also signed the same is a resident in the County of Grayson and is a credible person and that their Statement is entitled to credit. State of Virginia Grayson County On this 22nd day of October 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the Court of Grayson County, James Mortimer a resident of Grayson County in the State of Virginia, aged 76 years who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he enlisted in the army of the United States in the year 1778 or 1779 with Lieutenant Woodack and served in the New York artilary during the war. He does not now recollect the number of his Regiment but he served under the following named officers: Col Lamb commandant of the New York artilery and commandant of the regiment; Genl. Knox commander of the brigade, Lieutenant Col. Stephens Majr. Bowman, Majr. Doughty, Captain Motts who was taken sick & the company was then put under Capt Vanoy or Fannoy, Lieutenant Bradford, Lieutenant Campbell & Lieutenant Secrafts orderly sergent Higgins & Sergent Russell. He was discharged, at west point, in the year 1782 by Col. Lamb, but afterwards lost his discharge together with a good deal of Continental money in the city of New York. He resided in the State of New York when he enlisted. He does not remember in what County, but he remembers that he enlisted at a place on the North river then called New Windsor and was serving in a Militia Company at the time he enlisted. He was in the battle of White plane while he was in the Militia Service and was in Fort [page] 56 October 22d 1832 Montgomery when it was taken by the Brittish. He was also in the battle of Monmouth and then at the taking of Lord Cornwallis at York town in Virginia. He marched through the State of New Jersey and a part of Pennsylvania, Went by water from the head of Elk and landed where the french fleet lay before the Surrender of Cornwallis. The next winter he lay in Burlington barracks and during the term of his service he lay at Morris town in New jersey North redoubt, Stony point and Dalb ferry. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any agency of any State. Sworn to and subscribed the day & year aforesaid. James Mortimer, his mark And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier and served as he states. [page] 59 October 23d 1832 State of Virginia Grayson County On this 23d day of October 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the Court of Grayson County, Jonathan Thomas a resident of Grayson County in the State of Virginia, aged 69 years who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That in the year 1782 he volunteered against the tories and marched in a company under Capt. William Douglass in persuit of the tories, and overtook and defeated a party of them near Haw river in Orange County in the State of North Carolina, and after this he persued them into Chatham Guilford & Randolph Counties in North Carolina & then into the mountains of Virginia. About this time a tory by the name of Hightown killed Col. Mcbane of the Continental [page] 60 October 23d 1832 army and the company in which this declarant was then serving pursued the said Hightown & one of his brothers, but could not overtake either of them. One other tory, however, was taken in this Chase, by name of McRoberds, who through the darkness of the night afterwards made his escape. This declarant when the company were disbanded, received a discharge from Capt. William Douglass dated 15th day of March 1782, herewith forwarded for the inspection of the War department before the aforesaid Service, for which this declarant has the discharge aforesaid, in the year 1781. While in a Militia company commanded by a Capt. Richard Edwards of Orange County, North Carolina, this declarant was taken prisoner by the british & tories about 2 miles from Hillsboro in North Carolina, and taken by the enemy together with the Governor of North Carolina, his secretary and nearly all the members of the North Carolina Legislature, with many others amounting in number as well as he now recollects to 200 men, and carried them to Wilmington in the aforesaid State. Col. Archibald Lille of the regular troops was taken prisoner at the same time and place. The Brittish were commanded by a major Craig and after being kept at Wilmington a considerable time, intelligence of the Surrender of Cornwallis reached the British who immediately left the place for Charleston, and many of the tories returning to their homes in the upper part of North Carolina brought the declarant with them from whom he soon escaped and immediately joined Capt. Douglass company & served therein, as herein before stated. This declarant was a prisoner about 5 months as near as he can recollect. He was born in orange County, North Carolina, in the year 1762 Nov 29th. He has a record of his age, made by his father, now at home in his Bible. He resided in Orange County North Carolina untill May 1792 when he removed into Montgomery County in the State of Virginia afterwards Wythe County & now Grayson County, were he yet resides. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any agency of any State. He is known to Joshua Hanks & Eli Cook in his present County who can testify as to his character for veracity and thair belief of his services as a Souldier in the War of the revolution. Sworn to, and subscribed the day and year aforesaid. Jonathan Thomas We Joshua Hanks and Eli Cook, residing in the County of Grayson and State of Virginia, hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Jonathan Thomas who has sworn to a d subscribed to the above declaration: that we believe him to be 69 years of age; that he is reputed and believed in the neighbourhood where he resides to have been a Soldier of the revolution, and that we concur in that opinion. [page] 61 October 23d 1832 Sworn and subscribed the day and year aforesaid. Joshua Hanks Eli Cook And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion after the investigation of the matter and after putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier and served as he states. And the court further certifies that it appears to them that Joshua Hanks and Eli Cook who have signed the preceeding certificate are residents in the County of Grayson and are credible persons and that their Statement is entitled to credit. The discharge mentioned in the foregoing declaration is as follows, viz: This is to certify that Jonathan Thomas hath served a tower of duty of three months in my company in the District of Hillsborough in an Expedition against the tories and is hereby discharged from the same. Given under my hand this 15th day of March 1782. W. Douglass Capt. [page] 68 Novem 1832 State of Virginia Grayson County On this 27th day of November 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the Court of Grayson County now sitting, Samuel Ausburn a resident of Grayson aged seventy one years who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the united States as a substitute in place of Jacob Ausburn his father in the year 1776 under Captain Stephen Bloone who commanded a company of Militia in the Worchester township Philadelphia County State of Pennsylvania in a regiment he believes commanded by Colonel Farris from there he was marched into the Jersey to Trenton where they met the enemy and had a battle which culminated in the defeat of the enemy many of them were taken prisoners. This applicant was one who help to guard the prisoners across the Delaware river into Pennsylvania. The prisoners were sent up to Lancaster. This applicant was marched to Morristown where they went into winter quarers still under the command of Capt. Bloom who belonged to the army commanded by Genl. Washington during this winter. This applicant was discharged from a six months tour of duty by Capt Bloom which discharge is lost, during the Six months tower there was also a battle fought at Princetown but this declarant was not in that engagement. The next tower of service this declarant performed was a six months tower. Captain Henry Ship he was drafted into the service he believes some time in the year 1777, marched to the sweeds boro on the Schuylskill river where he ws stationed for some length of time from thence to Chadis Ford on the Brandywine where they joined the main army commanded by General Washington at that place a severe battle was fought which proved fatal to the americans; after this battle was fought the applicant was marched to the Warren town on the Lancaster road the sine of the white horse. Hare we were near coming to another engagement with the enemy but was prevented by heavy storm of rain. From there he was marched to the Shippack road & stationed there for some time, from thence to Germantown where we again met the enemy had a heavy engagement commanded by Green & Washington which battle terminated against the americans. From there we retreated to Parkiaming [?] where [page] 69 Novem 1832 the term of service of this applicant was out. He was discharged by Capt Ship & returned home in all these engagements this applicant escaped unhurt. Though at one time a ball passed through the clothing near his neck this discharge is also lost. This applicant further states that the succeeding winter the army commanded by General Washington pitched their head quarters at the Valley Forge the head quarters of the army were at Philadelphia. That it became ne[ce]ssary to keep a standing army between there to prevent the americans in the neighborhood from trading with the enemy and to drive in the foraging sorties of the enemy who frequently came into the County for supplies. This applicant together with fifty or sixty other young men whom this declarant had been in habit of commanding at a military school previous to the war formed themselves into a volunteer company for this purpose. This applicant was chosen by said company the commander or captain. He excepted the appointment & stationed his company at the Crooked Billot [?] in Philadelphia County State of Pennsylvania where he remained with his company during the time the two armies remained at the two above mentioned places. From thence they marched to Mount Holly in New Jersey with Genl. Maxwell & there joined Genl. Dickerson who commanded the Jersey Militia, this applicant still at the head of his company of Volunteers who had determined to serve during the war he remained between Newyork & Philadelphia in frequent light skermishes for the space of a bout fifteen months including the time he ws stationed at the Crooked Bettle [?] above mentioned when a fever occasioned by the fatigue of the company fell into his leg which compelled him to quit the service some of his company returned home with him & the residue joined other companies & stayed with the army. This applicant states that during the time he commanded this company as a captain (which he was a bout fifteen months) he was a Volunteer and never had a Commission. The above mentioned fever in his leg terminated in a soar leg which renders this applicant a cripple to this time. This applicant states that he removed from Philadelphia County State of Pennsylvania where he then lived about three years after the revolutionary war he moved to Guilford County North Carolina & in the year 1797 he moved to the [page] 72 Novem 1832 County of Grayson & State of Virginia where he has resided ever since. He is unable to procure any positive evidence of his services in consequence of these having been rendered at so great a distance from his present abode. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state. Sworn to & subscribed the day & year aforesaid. Sl. Ausburn We Edward Jones clergyman residing in the County of Grayson and Jabez Johnson residing in the same County, do hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Samuel Ausburn who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration that we believe him to be seventy one years of age or thereabouts, that he is reputed and believed in this neighborhood where he resides to have been a soldier of the revolution and we concur in that opinion. Sworn and subscribed the day and year aforesaid. Edward Jones Jabez Johnson And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion after the investigation of the matter, and after putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department, that the above named applicant was a Revolutionary soldier and served as he states; and the Court further certifies that it appears to them that Edward Jones who has signed the preceeding certificate is a clergyman resndent in the County of Grayson, and that Jabez Johnson who has also signed the same is a resident in the County of Grayson, and is a credible person, and their statement is entitled to credit. [page] 79 February 1833 Timothy Spencer appeared in Court and made an amended declaration on oath in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832 concerning Revolution souldiers which is ordered to be certified to the war department.
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2. What follows is a transcript of Benjamin Vaughan's affidavit for his mother Nancy (Callicott) Vaughan's Revolutionary War pension application. Ben was one of the middle born children of John and Nancy, and he gives in 1858 a bit of information on where his sister Rebecca lived:
State of Tennessee county of Hancock
Be it remembered that on this 28 day of May AD 1858 formally appeared before me a Justice of the Peace in and for the county aforementioned Benjamin Vaughn aged about 54 years, after being by me duly-sworn according to you both on his oath depose and say that he will be fifty four years of age on the 4th day of November in 1858 to the best of his knowledge information and belief and that he further certifies that the enclosed record of my father .John & Nancy Vaughn is the record which was found knowing my fathers old paper and it has ever since remained to my possession and as to the correctness of which I certify that I can recollect the birth of Samuel, Martha & George W. Vaughn which part of the record I certify from my resolution and from circumstances is correct and that I certify that James, Polly. Beverly. Rebeky Vaughn are all four elder than me and that the last account I had of James he was in the State of Texas and that the last account I had of Beverly he was in the State of Arkansas and that Polly lives in Hawkins County in the State of Tennessee. Rebecky lives in the State of MO the last account, and that Nancy, Mahaly & John are all three younger than me but I cannot recollect the dates of their births and that Nancy & John lives in this county and that Mahaly is dead and that Samuel resides in the county and that the last account of George is he lived near Nashville Tennessee and that Martha lives in Knox County in the Stale of Tennessee and that my father John Vaughan died on the 14 day of July 1842 and that at his death he left a will in which I certify he willed to me John & Samuel Vaughn the tract of land where and now live and where on Samuel now lives that they paid him after the death of their said father $100. for his part of said tract of land and that his other lands and Tenements was divided amongst the other heirs and that I further certify that I know of know other record of the dates and births of said heirs or any other dates I recorded after the marriage if any such record either private or public he does not know any thing of them, and I further certify that after the Act of 1832 I heard my father frequently speak of his claim that he said that he would not trouble himself about it that he did not need it and that in
Several occasions I have heard him in conversation with one Samuel Doloson who is nomore and who runs a van, drinking character and who applied for pension that if he, Doloson, could obtain his pension and could get what was due to him JohnVaughn that he, Doloson. would have money enough to pay for his drinking and that Doloson never received a pension as I know of.
In witness I do here unto set my hand and seal the day and year aforesaid
Benjamin
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http://www.therooms.ca/archives/pdfs/panel3.pdf WWII Vets Vaughan's History


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