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David Andrew Todd Decendants

Descendants of David Andrew Todd
Generation No. 1
1. DAVID ANDREW4 TODD (ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 08 April 1723 in Down, Armagh Co. Ireland,
and died 08 February 1785 in Lexington, KY. He married HANNAH OWEN 04 April 1749 in Lancaster Co, PA.
She was born 25 October 1725 in Wales, England, and died 1814 in Lexington, KY.
Notes for DAVID ANDREW TODD:
Excerpt from "Historic Families of Kentucky," by Thomas Marshall Green, originally published Cincinnati, 1889,
reprinted for Clearfield Co., by Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1996, p. 209:
"David Todd, second son of Robert (emigrant), was born in Ireland, April 8, 1723: when a child was brought by
his father to Pennsylvania; lived there, as a farmer, in the Providence townhip of Montgomery Co. until 1783,
when he came to Kentucky. His sons, John, Robert and Levi, had preceded him to Kentucky, and John had
already been killed at the Blue Licks. His youngest son Owen (settled in Ohio), and his daughter Hannah (who
married Elijah Smith) came with him. So too, came his brother-in-law, James Parker, and his sister Mary. David
Todd died in Fayette Co., February 8, 1785. His wife whom he married in Pennsylvania, was Hannah Owen, of
Welsh descent, and a Quakeress. They had four sons and two daughters - John, Robert, Levi, Owen, Elizabeth
and Hannah."
Excert from "History of Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois", by John Carrol Power, 1876.
"The first of this family in America came from the north of Ireland, and it is known that they were originally from
Scotland. A man by the name of Todd - it is thought that his first name was David - was married in Ireland to
Hannah Owen, and came to America, with other members of the family, previous to the American Revolution.
(NOTE: David came to America as a child. If his family came in 1737, he would have been 14 yrs. old. I really
don't think he was married before he came here.) They settled in Pequea, Lancaster County, Pensylvania, and had
three sons, John, Robert and Levi. They were educated by their uncle, parson John Todd, who conducted a
ltierary institution in Virginia. These three brothers emigrated about 1778 or 1779 to what became Fayette
County, Kentucky. They were all influential men in the Indian wars, and in forming the institutions of that state."
From the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Vol. 50, page 141, DAR ID Number:
49322: David Todd (1723-85) served as a private in the Pennsylvania State troops, 6th and 9th battalions, 4th
and 5th Lancaster County, Pa., militia, 1775-80. He was born in Ireland; died in Lexington, Ky.
From "Todd Family," aby Emily Todd Helm, Kittochtinney Magazine, January 1905, p. 75:
"DAVID TODD (born in Co. Armagh, Ireland, April 8, 1723 -- died Feb. 8, 1785), son of Robert and ---------
(Smith) Todd, was a farmer in Montgomery Co., Pa. In 1760 he bought from the Proprietaries of Pennsylvaia
150 acres of land on the Perkiomen, nearly opposite Phoenixville. In 1765 he purchased another tract of 44 acres,
and in 1775 a third tract of 58 acres. These three tracts adjoined each other, forming a plantation of 252 acres.
His home was where the village of Mont Clare now stands. In 1783 he sold his farm, which then comprised 246
acres, for $12,000, and removed to Kentuckythe next year to join his sons Levi and Robert. He died in Kentucky.
Mr. Todd's house in Montgomery County stood about two hundred yards east of what was known as the corner
store, owned by his brother Robert. It was a few miles distand from Lower Providence Presbyterian Church, of
which he was a member. In the graveyard attached to this early meeting house many of the Todd are buried.
Mr. Todd married April 4, 1749, Hannah Owen, (born Oct 25, 1725--died at the residence of her son, Gen. Levi
Todd, near Lexington, Ky.), of Welsh descent, said to be descended from the first Quaker in Wales."
Children of DAVID TODD and HANNAH OWEN are:
2. i. COLONEL JOHN5 TODD, b. 27 March 1750, Montgomery Co., PA; d. 18 August 1782, Blue Licks, KY.
3. ii. GENERAL ROBERT TODD, b. 19 April 1754, Montgomery Co. PA; d. 01 March 1814, Lexington, Fayette
Co., KY.
4. iii. MAJOR GENERAL LEVI TODD, b. October 1756, Montgomery Co. PA; d. 06 September 1807, Lexington,
Fayette Co., KY.
iv. ELIZABETH TODD, b. 13 November 1757, Montgomery Co. PA; m. ROGER NORTH.
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5. v. OWEN TODD, b. 20 April 1762, Providence, Montgomery Co. PA; d. 06 December 1817, Vevay, IN.
6. vi. HANNAH TODD, b. 11 January 1765, Montgomery Co. PA; d. 19 September 1822, Georgetown, Scott Co.,
KY.
Generation No. 2
2. COLONEL JOHN5 TODD (DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 27 March 1750 in Montgomery
Co., PA, and died 18 August 1782 in Blue Licks, KY. He married JANE HAWKINS 1780 in VA. She was born
1757 in VA.
Notes for COLONEL JOHN TODD:
The oldest son of David Todd and Hannah Owen, John, was educated in Virginia by his uncle, Parson John Todd,
studied law, and became one of the deputy surveyors employed by Col. Wm. Preston. He is asserted by John
Mason Brown to have been an aide to Gen. Andrew Lewis in the battle of Point Pleasant. He came to Kentucky
early in 1775, and was at St. Asaphs with John Floy and Gen. Logan in the spring of that year. He represented St.
Asaphs in the abortive attempt to establish the territorial government of Transylvania. In 1777, he was one of the
first two burgesses sent by Kentucky Co. to the Virginia General Assembly. He succeeded George Rogers Clarke
in command at Kaskaskia, and was for sevral years civil governor and colonel of the company of Illinois. When
Bryant's Station was besieged, in August 1782, Col. Todd was again in Kentucky. With such men as could be
assembled at Lexington, and with the forces at Boonesboro and Harrodsburg, he marched without waiting for
Gen. Logan with the well-equipped veteral fighters of Lincoln, and fell at the Blue Licks. While a Burgess at
Richmond he married Jane Hawkins, by whom he had a daughter. This daughter married first, Col. Russell, and
after his death became the seond wife of Robert Wickliffe, Sr. Her son by Russell dying, she made a deed of gift
to her second husband by which all the large estte of Col. John Todd passed to the family of Mr. Wickliffe, to the
exclusion of those of her own blood. Mildred Hawkins, a sister of Jane, married Capt. Pierce Butler of the
Revolution, and was the mother of Maj. Thomas L., Gen. William O., and Richard Butler, of Carrollton, and of
the late Pierce Butler of Louisville.
Col. John Todd was the best educated and most accomplished, and is represented to have been the most richly
endowed by nature, of all the early pioneers and surveyors of Kentucky. He was one of the best educated men in
Kentucky; possesed a nice sense of honor, was strictly moral, and stood high in the confidence of the people.
Excerpt from "History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois - Centennial Record," by John Carroll
Power, 1876:
"John Todd, under commission from Patrick Henry, Governor of Virginia, dated Dec. 12, 1778, at Williamsburg,
then the capital of the state, was authorized to establish the county of Illinois. He was styled in his commission as
the County Lieutenant Commandant. As such he organized the county, and thus became in fact, though not in
name, the first Governor of Illinois. His first act was to issue a proclamation with reference to land titles, June 15,
1779. Nearly three years later he had been to Virginia, and on his way back made it convenient to visit his family
in Kentucky. While at Lexington, news came that the Indians west of the Ohio River were crossing over into
Kentucky. Colonel Todd, as one of the commanders, was slain at the battle of Blue Licks, August 18, 1782."
From Emma Siggins White, "Descendants of John Walker of Wigton" 1902, p. 56:
"John, Robert and Levi Todd were educated in Va., in a school taught by their uncle, Rev. John Todd. The
eldest, Col. John Todd, studied law, and was the first civil governor and Lieutenant Commander of Illinois.
These three brothers were in the Revolutionary War under Gen. George Rogers Clarke.
Col John Todd was appointed by Patrick Henry, Dec. 12, 1778, Lt. Commander of Illinois. He represented
Kentucky in the General Assembly of Virginia in 1778, and his brothers formed a part of the expedition to Illinois
County. For three years Col. John Todd held the responsible position of Lt. Cmdr. In 1780 he was again chosen
a delegate to the Virginia Legislature. In this year Kentucky (county) was divided into three counties, Lincoln,
Jefferson and Fayette; and Thomas Jefferson, then governor of Virginia, appointed Col. John Todd colonel of
Fayette County, Daniel Boon Lieutenant Colonel, and Thomas Marshall Surveyor.
During the summer of 1782, an Indian uprising aroused the county, and the militia was summoned to repel it.
Col. Todd, as senior colonel, took command of the little army sent in pursuit of retreating savages. The force
included Daniel Boone and many other illustrious Kentuckians. On Aug. 18, 1782, they came up with the Indians
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at Blue Licks, and one of the most disastrous battles to the whites on Kentucky soil followed. Col. John Todd fell
at the head of his men, shot through the body. Nearly all of this little band was killed or wounded. Among the
wounded were his brothers, Gen. Levi and Gen. Robert Todd. Gen. Levi Todd, the 3rd brother, was the
grandfather of Mrs. (Abraham) Lincoln and father of Hannah, who married Robert Stuart."
It is noted that three members of a scouting party in 1775 carved their names on a tree near what is now
Boonesboro, Kentucky; one was Daniel Boone, and another was this John Todd.
From http://www.rootsweb.com/~kyfayett/lexfort.htm is a description of the fort in Lexington built by troops
commanded by Colonel John Todd.
From "Todd Family," by Emily Todd Helm, Kittochtinney Magazine, published by G.O.Seilhamer,
Chambersburg,PA, Vol. 1, No. 1(Jan 1905), pp 83-84:
"JOHN TODD (born in Montgomery Co., Pa., March 27, 1750 -- died at Blue Licks, Ky., Aug. 19, 1782), son of
David and Hannah (Owen) Todd, was educated in the school of his uncle, the Rev. John Todd, in Louisa County,
Va., and studied law with Gen. Andrew Lewis, under whom he served as adjutant-general in the expedition
against the Indians that resulted in the battle of Point Pleasant, in 1774. In 1775, he went to Kentucky, then a
wilderness. On the north side of Barren River, about three miles from Bowling Green, a group of beech trees is
still standing on which were cut the names of thirteen members of an exploring party from Harrod's Station, now
Harrodsburg. One of these names is that of J. Todd, with the date of June 13, 1775. Another tree is inscribed, "J.
Todd, June 17, 1775." In 1776 he settled at Lexington, where he served as judge of the first court in Kentucky
county. With Richard Calloway he was chosen a burgess in the Virginia Legislature, April 19, 1777, and he was
appointed county lieutenant and colonel of militia for Fayette county upon its creation. After the conquest of the
Illinois, by Gen. George Rogers Clarke, in 1778, in which he participated, Colonel Todd was appointed by Gov.
Patrick Henry, Dec. 28, 1778, county lieutenant of the county of Illinois, and he arrived at Kaskaskia from
Vincennes early in May 1779. He thus virtually became the first governor of the Illinois territory. He was
instructed to use every effort to win the friendship of the French; to conciliate the Indians as far as possible, and
to punish all violations of their property, especially of their lands; and to give assistance to General Clarke in his
projected expedition against Detroit. Todd's administration though brief was vigorous. He organized the militia
and directed the election of judges and court officers. Licenses to trade were granted. Being a shrewd man he
provided against an inrush of a horde of Virginia and Kentucky speculators, who would seize upon the best land
on the river bottoms, by a decree that each settler should take up his land in the shape of the narrow French farms
that stretched back from the water front, no claim to exceed the number of acres in one of these French farms.
His financial policy, however was a failure because it was based on Continental money, and this rendered it
difficult to get the creoles to furnish supplies. Finally, Todd was compelled to resort to impressment to feed the
troops, paying at the regulation prices one-third in paper money and two-thirds in peltries. Colonel Todd's
'Record Book' contains the history of his rule as the first civil governor of Illinois. The MS. of this 'Record' is in
the possession of the Chicago Historical Society, and there is an account of it in the Fergus Hist. Series. In 1780,
Todd was again elected a member of the Virginia Legislature, and he afterward made one of two flying visits to
Illinois, but took little active part in the affairs of the country, leaving their control to his deputy or lieutenant
commandant. In the Virginia Legislature he secured the passage of acts that resulted in the foundation of
Transylvania University, and he introduced a bill for negro emancipation. The three brothers, John, Robert, and
Levi, were all opposed to slavery as a permanent institution, and though each owned slaves, they were treated in
the most humane manner. At the time of the Indian attack on Bryan's Station, in 1782, Col. Todd, as County
Lieutenant of Fayette county, by virtue of his commission in the Virginia line, was next to General Clarke, the
ranking officer of the Kentucky forces, and Colonel Commandant he led the centre at the battle of Blue Licks.
The defeat was precipitated by the headlong disobedience of Major McGarry. While Todd, by voice and example
was doing all in his power to keep his men firm, he was shot through the body and mortally wounded. The blood
gushed from his mouth; his strength failed him; he leaned forward and fell from the saddle. According to some
accounts his horse carried him to the river and he fell in its current. An account of his death was written in the
Lexington Observer & Reporter, June 17, 1848, in which his brother Levi gave in writing the facts connected with
the death of his brother. "He rode a white horse, and being struck with a ball and faint he dismounted, but
recovered, remounted and a second shot closed his career. After the troops had recrossed the Licking the Indians
were observed in considerable numbers around the white horse where he lay." With Todd's death the battle
became a rout. Todd was the only officer in the fray that carried a sword, which he had borrowed from Boone.
The blade was short and roughly made of good steel. The hilt was buckhorn and the guard was of iron, oneeighth
of an inch thick. This sword was lost in Licking river. When recovered it was identified by Mrs. Todd as
the one that her husband borrowed from Daniel Boone. Colonel Todd was a man of generous impulses and of
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high and noble character. He was once before defeated by the Indians at the Licking, while conveying a quantity
of power to Clarke from Limestone Ridge, in 1777. With him was a party of nine men, four of whom were killed.
Todd county was named in his honor, in 1819. Colonel Todd married in Virginia, in 1780, Jane Hawkins; A
daughter, born after his death, and his only child that lived was MARY, married (1) James Russell; they had one
son, John Todd, who died aged twenty. Mrs. Russell married (2) Robert Wickliffe, Esq. of Lexington, Ky., but
they had no children."
Notes for JANE HAWKINS:
Jane had a sister, Mildred Hawkins who married Capt. Pierce Butler of American Revolution. Their children
were: Maj. Thomas L. Butler, Gen. William O. Butler, Richard Butler, and Pierce Butler.
Child of JOHN TODD and JANE HAWKINS is:
7. i. MARY6 TODD, b. Aft. 1780.
3. GENERAL ROBERT5 TODD (DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 19 April 1754 in Montgomery
Co. PA, and died 01 March 1814 in Lexington, Fayette Co., KY. He married NANCY ANNE TODD 03 January
1782 in VA, daughter of JOHN TODD and MARGARET THOMPSON. She was born 26 August 1754, and died 31
August 1828.
Notes for GENERAL ROBERT TODD:
Excerpt from "Historic Families of Kentucky," by Thomas Green, 1889, in VA State Library, Richmond, VA,
1952, in "Todds":
"Robert, second son of David Todd and Hannah Owen, was well educated at the school of his uncle, Parson John
Todd, whose daught he married; then studied law in Virginia, it is said in the office of And. Lewis; came early to
Kentucky; was sent as a burgess to the Virginia Legislature before the separation; was a member of the Danville
Convention of 1785; was an elector of the senate, and a senator, in 1792; was a lot owner in Lexington in 1783;
was wounded in the defense of McClellan's Fort, now Georgetown, in 1776; active and brave soldier all through
the trouble with Indians, and was often intrusted with important commands; and was for many years, after the
state was established, a judge of the Circuit Court of the Fayette District, - (Collins). One of his daughters
married Gen. Wm. Butler. Judge Levi and Col. Thomas Todd, of Indiana, and the late Dr. John Todd of
Danville, were his sons."
Excerpt from "Centennial Record - History of Early Settlers of Sangamon Co., Ill," by John Power, 1876:
"Robert Todd, the second brother, acquired the title of General in connection with the Indian wars, and later
military operations in KY. None of his descendants ever came to Illinois. One daughter became the wife of Wm.
Butler, of Carrollton, KY."
From http://www.rootsweb.com/~kyfayett/surveyfound.htm is a story from the Lexington Leader dtd Jan 1891,
identifying the first town survey of Lexington. The survey is dtd Mar 24, 1791, and is signed by Robert Todd,
S.F.
Affidavit of William Meriwether, Jan 11, 1833, in behalf of the heirs of Levi Todd and Robert Todd. (See p. 563)
Rev. War Records VA: Section IV:
"William Meriwether stated that he joined Capt. John Rogers' Troop of Light Dragoons, which was raised in
Spotsylvania and Culpeper Cos., VA, which was to be sent to the Western Country to join Gen. George Rogers
Clark's Regt. John Rogers was comm. Capt. of the Co., and marched to the Ill. Country to join Gen. Clark's Regt.
Shortly after Christmas 1779 or 1780, the Troop of Dragoons landed at Ft. Pitt, then called by that name, where
Pittsburgh now stands. The rivr Ohio then froze up so that the troops were detained there until the Spring of
1780. When the ice broke up, the troop went down the river to the Falls of the Ohio, and from there to Ft.
Jefferson, a few miles below the mouth of the Ohio on the Mississippi river, where Rogers' Troop of Horse joined
for the first time Gen. George Rogers Clark's Regt. When the troops got there Clark's Regt. was on the ground.
The troop together with Clark's regt. built the fort, called Ft. Jefferson. Sometime before this, that is in the winter
of 1779, Clark had taken Vincennes and Kaskaskia, and many other places of the British forts in the Ill. country.
At Ft. Jefferson, or at the Falls of the Ohio, Meriwether stated that he will recollected that Robert Todd and Levi
Todd were there in Clark's Regt. and acting commissioned officers in the same. He does not recollect their rank,
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but believed they were bros., and went into the Regt. when it was raised and marched from VA with the Regt.
The country around Ft. Jefferson was a wilderness for 400 miles distant. He believes that both Levi and Robert
Todd completed the entire expedition in taking the several British posts in Ill. In the fall of 1780, Clark's Regt.
came from Ft. Jefferson to the Falls of the Ohio, while the troop of Rogers, under the command of John
Montgomery was taking or destroying other posts of the enemy in the summer of 1780. In the year 1781, after the
surrender of Lord Cornwallis the regiment of Clark was reduced and Robert todd went to VA and married in
1782, and Levi Todd remained in KY., and was in the Blue Lick defeat, fought in Aug. 1782, when Col. John
Todd was slain. William Meriwether was not again required by Gen. Clark to go into service, nor was Robert
Todd or Levi Todd."
Revolutionary War Officers; Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army; Fifteenth Virginia, pg 545;
Todd, Robert (VA). Capt. of Clark's Ill. Reg. 1778 to 1782.
From "Todd Family," by Emily Todd Helm, Kittochtinney Magazine Jan. 1905 p. 85:
"ROBERT TODD, born in Montgomery Co., PA., Apr. 19, 1754 - died Mar 20, 1814, son of David and Hannah
(Owen) Todd, went to KY in 1776. He was in McClellan's Ft, (Georgetown), when it was attacked by the Indians
in the year of his removal, and was severly wounded in the hip. While convalescing he was attacked by a buffalo
bull; his shoulder blade was broken and one of the animal's horns penetrated his lungs. When McClellan's Ft. was
abgandoned, Jan 30, 1777, Mr. Todd went to Harrodsburg. In 1778, he became a captain in Gen. George Rogers
Clarke's little army of conquest, and was in all of Clarke's campaigns against the English and the Indians. His
commission was in a VA state regiment, 1778-1782. In 1787 he was in command of an expedition to the Scioto
river region, north of the Ohio, in which three Indians were killed and seven captured. He was a man of rigid,
unbending integrity, and one of the bravest soldiers of Kentucky of that early day. Captain Todd was a skillful
surveyor and served as surveyor of Fayette county. He settled at Lexington, where he became an extensive land
owner. He was one of the commissioners to choose the seat of government for the new State of Kentucky, and
gave his deciding vote for Frankfort instead of Lexington to avoid a suspicion of being governed by self interest
in his choice. He held a number of civil offices. He was chosen a state senator for Fayette Co., in 1792, and was
Quarter Sessions Judge and afterward Assistant Judge of the Circuit Court of the County. When the record office
of the county was burned, Jan 31, 1803, he was one of the nine gentlemen who carefully copied the charred
record books. Like his brothers, John and Levi, he was opposed to slavery, and in 1799 he emancipated his
slaves, one of whom had accompanied him in all his campaigns. Captain, afterward known as General Todd,
married Jan. 3, 1782, his cousin, Anne Todd (b. Aug 26, 1756 - d. Aug 31, 1828), daughter of John and Margaret
(Thompson) Todd."
Notes for NANCY ANNE TODD:
One source says she was b. 1756.
Children of ROBERT TODD and NANCY TODD are:
i. COLONEL JOHN6 TODD, b. 15 October 1783.
ii. MARGARET THOMPSON TODD, b. 28 September 1787.
iii. DAVID FAYETTE TODD, b. 08 May 1788.
iv. THOMAS J. TODD, b. Lexington, Fayette Co., KY.
v. GENERAL LEVI LUTHER TODD, b. 26 July 1791, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY; m. JANE BRIGGS.
vi. ELIZA TODD.
4. MAJOR GENERAL LEVI5 TODD (DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born October 1756 in
Montgomery Co. PA, and died 06 September 1807 in Lexington, Fayette Co., KY. He married (1) JANE BRIGGS
25 February 1779 in Stanford, KY, daughter of SAMUEL BRIGGS and SARAH LOGAN. She was born June 1761,
and died 1800. He married (2) JANE HOLMES 1801 in KY. She was born 07 August 1770 in VA.
Notes for MAJOR GENERAL LEVI TODD:
One of the first emigrants to Kentucky. Appointed first clerk of Fayette County Court (1780-1807) by Kentucky's
first governor, Isaac Shelby. Built first house in Fayette Co., KY. Named "Ellerslie" after the small Scottish
village where his 16th century Todd ancestors had lived. Buried in Lexington Cemetery. Tombstone reads,
"General Levi Todd - a youthful adventurer to Kentucky and active in its defense in the most perilous time."
From "Robert Stuart and his Descendants," by Robert Stuart Sanders, 1962:
"Major General Levi Todd was one of the defenders of the fort at Horrodsburg; he afterwards assisted Logan to
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hold Ft. St. Asaphs at Stanford, KY; was major, colonel, brigadier and major general of Kentucky forces till his
death in 1807."
From "Historic Families of Kentucky," by Thomas Marshall Green, originally published Cincinnati, 1889,
reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1996, p 212-213:
"Levi, third son of David Todd and Hannah Owen, was born in Pennsylvania, 1756; was educated with his elder
brothers in VA; with them studies law, became a surveyor, came early to KY, and at first seems to have been one
of the defenders of the fort at Harrodsburg; afterward he assisted Logan to hold St. Asaphs. He was stationed at
St. Asaphs when he married Jane or Betsy Briggs. Afterward, he fortified Todd's Station, in Jessamine, whence
he removed to Lexington, where he was a purchaser at the first sale of lots, 1781. He was a clerk of the first court
of quarter sessions held in Harrodsburg, spring 1777; was a member of both the Danville conventions of 1785,
and 1787. When Fayette Co. was formed, he was appointed its first clerk, and held the office until his death in
1807. The three brothers, John, Robert, and Levi, were all opposed to slavery as a permanent institution, and
though each owned slaves, they were treated in the most humane manner. He was a lieutenant under George
Rogers Clarke against Kaskaskia, and Vincennes; was with Logan in the attack upon the Indian town when
Bowman's panic thwarted the well-concerted plan; was major of Logan's Lincoln Co. regiment, and participated
in two other expeditions against the Indians of Ohio and Indiana; and was a major in the hottest of the fight at
Blue Licks, where his gallant and gifted brother fell. According to an article in the Lexington Observer &
Reporter, June 17, 1848, he comanded a battalion in the battle of Blue Licks. He dismounted, tied his horse, and
fought on foot that day, and subsequently gave in writing the facts connected with the death of his brother,
Colonel John Todd. Afterward, he became brigadier and then a major-general. Those military titles were won by
actual service; his reputation was secured by real and hard fighting. A solid, substantial, enterprising citizen; a
sensible, intelligent, well-educated man; a consistent Presbyterian; a valuable and faithful public servant; a good
soldier; - of course he was respected at a time when those qualities were most useful and honored. Gen. Levi
Todd and Jane or Betsy Briggs, were the parents of 11 children. After the death of his first wife, he married Mrs.
Tatum, by whom he had a son, James, the father of Dr. L. B. Todd, of Lexington."
From "Centennial History - History of Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois," by John Power, 1876.
"Levi Todd, the youngest of the three brothers, was engaged in the early Indian wars in Kentucky, and was a
lieutenant under Col. Clark in the expedition that left Corn Island, opposite Louisville, and captured Ft. Gates and
the village of Kaskaskia, July 4, 1778. M. Rocheblave, the commander of the fort, was so mortified at his having
been surprised and captured without firing a gun, that he would not accept any courtesies from his captors, and
was sent under a military guard to VA. Lieutenant Levi Todd commanded the squad of soldiers who took the
prisoner back. He afterwards acquired the title of General, was clerk of the second court of Fayette Co. KY, the
greater part of his life, and lived and died in Lexington."
From the "Reminiscences from the Life of Col. Cave Johnson", by Cave Johnson, 1849, several months before his
passing. Pub. in the KY Register May 1922. Reprinted in the Johnson Digest, by Robert & Louise Stracener
Payne. Private Printing, 1990:
"In the year 1786, the government authorized Gen. Clark to carry out another expedition against them, which he
undertook, and raised a considerable force. Col. Levi Todd was selected to command Fayette troops, and Benj.
Logan from the south of KY; Col. Wm. Steele, Capt Robert Sanders and myself were selected as Captains, with
others whose names I do not recollect. In Col. Todd's regiment we rendevoused at the Falls, where Gen. Clark
took command. He sent his field piece by water down the Ohio and up the Wabash. The army marched by land,
and on the way, before reaching Vincennes, the officers held a council of war, and sent Col. Logan back for the
purpose of raising another army and marching into the Indian country on the Miami, presuming that the Indians
were generally collected on the Wabash in order to meet our expedition. We marched on to Vincennes where we
remained a number of days waiting for our cannon, which was detained by low water, until we had eaten up
nearly all our provisions. When the cannon arrived, we marched on up the river about two days, when the
regiment that Logan left, mutinied and refused to go further, alleging they had not sufficient stock of provisions,
etc. I suppose losing their Colonel had its influence. Gen. Clark was mortified. We returned home. Col. Logan
with the command he had raised, went into the Miami country, and succeeded against the Indians fully up to
expectations."
Among the list of residents of Ft. Harrod were Levi Todd and family, and Robert Todd.
General Todd married (1) Feb. 25, 1779, Jane briggs (died 1800), daughter of Capt. Samuel and Sarah (Logan)
Briggs, and a niece of Gen. Benjamin and John Logan. It is a tradition in the Todd family that Jane Briggs wove
her wedding garmet from a weed known as wild cotton. General Todd married (2) the widow, Mrs. Tatum (born
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Holmes), of Carlisle, PA
Notes for JANE HOLMES:
When Jane married Levi Todd, she was Mrs. Tatum, a widow.
Children of LEVI TODD and JANE BRIGGS are:
i. ANN MARIA6 TODD, b. 17 June 1778; d. 1884; m. WALTER BULLOCK.
ii. HANNAH TODD, b. February 1781, Harrodsburg, Mercer Co., KY; m. REV. ROBERT STUART.
Notes for HANNAH TODD:
Died of coholera.
iii. ELIZABETH TODD, b. 1782; d. 1863; m. CHARLES CARR.
iv. NANCY TODD, m. JOHN TODD.
8. v. DOCTOR JOHN TODD, b. 27 April 1787, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY.
vi. DAVID TODD, b. 29 March 1786, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY; m. ELIZA BARR.
Notes for DAVID TODD:
Judge. Lived Columbia, MO.
9. vii. ROBERT SMITH TODD, b. 25 February 1791, Harrodsburg, KY; d. 15 July 1849, Springfield, Sangamon, IL.
viii. SAMUEL BRIGGS TODD, b. 15 May 1793, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY.
ix. MARGARET TODD, m. WILLIAM RODES.
x. ROGER NORTH TODD, b. 05 September 1797, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY; m. (UNKNOWN) FERGUSON.
Notes for ROGER NORTH TODD:
Honorable North Todd. Was he a lawyer or a judge? Lived in Columbia, MO, where his brother, Judge
David Todd also lived.
xi. JANE BRIGGS TODD, b. 03 June 1798; m. JUDGE DANIEL BRECK.
Child of LEVI TODD and JANE HOLMES is:
xii. JAMES CLARKE6 TODD, b. 09 August 1802, KY.
5. OWEN5 TODD (DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 20 April 1762 in Providence,
Montgomery Co. PA, and died 06 December 1817 in Vevay, IN. He married (1) ELIZABETH SMITH 1782. She
was born Abt. 1766 in Providence, PA, and died Abt. 1783. He married (2) MARIA JANE PAXTON 09 June 1790,
daughter of (COL.) (COL.) THOMAS PAXTON. She was born 22 April 1772 in Providence, PA, and died 1834 in
Madison, IN.
Notes for OWEN TODD:
He left home at the age of 17 and took part in the storming of Stony Point, July 15, 1779, under Gen. Anthony
Wayne, who was a neighbor and friend of his father. It is said that his conspicuous bravery on this occasion drew
forth from Wayne the warmest praise, and would have gained him a commission but for his youth. It is probably
that his presence with the Pennsylvania troops on the Hudson, in 1779, was without the knowledge of his parents,
as in 1780-81, he was with his brother-in-law, Roger North, a member of Capt. Alexander Johnston's company of
Volunteer Light Horse, of Chester county. In 1794, Owen Todd with his parents and the family of his brother-inlaw,
Elijah Smith, migrated to Kentrucky, where his three elder brothers, John, Robert and Levi, had gone before
the revolution. Land was bought on Cane Run, a branch of the North Fork of Elkhorn Creek, Fayette Co., at a
point nine miles from the village of Lexingon. Here the parents took up their residence and their children and
relatives found homes in the vicinity. Like many of the adventurous and better educated young men of that day,
who found their way to the west, Owen Todd had familiarized himself with the duties of a land surveyor. For this
occupation his education, his physical constitution, and his tastes eminently fitted him. He had brought with him
the implements of his profession, and his services were soon in requistion by the settlers of the rich soil of
Kentucky, with each of whom his earliest wish was realized only when he had secured a home for himself and
some friend left behind in the "old country," as they termed the place from which they had migrated. For several
years he was employed in private and government surveying, at first in Kentucky and later on the waters of the
Little Miami River in Southwestern Ohio, where a stream known as Todd's Fork of the Little Miami still bears his
name. In 1786, then being a resident of Kentucky, he acompanied the expedition of Gen. George Rogers Clarke
8
against the Indian towns on the Wabash River, but in what capacity is not known, probably as a private. He was
commissioned by Gov. Edmund Randolph, of Virginia, to take rank from Sept 9, 1789. During the years
following he was engaged in frequent expeditions against the Indians. In August, 1791, he commanded a
company under Gen. James Wilkinson in the second expedition against the Indians on the Upper Wabash River,
and Aug. 20, 1794, fifteen years after his boyish adventure at Stony Point, he again fought under General Wayne,
commanding a company of Kentuckians in the brigade of his elder brother, Gen. Robert Todd, at the Battle of
Fallen Timbers, on the Maumee River, Ohio, generally known as "Wayne's Victory".
In 1797, Owen Todd moved to Hamilton County, Ohio, locating on the east bank of Little Miami River, on
O'Bannon's Creek, one mile east of the present town of Loveland, where his wife's family, the Paxtons, had
preceded him two years before. When the county of Clermont was organized, Dec. 6th, 1800, the Todd and
Paxton families found themselves citizens of Clermont County, and indeed were the first actual settlers in that
county. Owen Todd was presiding Judge of the first Court of General Quarter Sessions convened in the county,
on the first Tuesday in February, 1801, at Williamsburgh, then the county seat, which position he held until
December, 1803. During the occupancy of this home, a period of six or eight years, he did a great deal of private
surveying. In much of this work he was associated with William Lytle, afterwards Major General of the Ohio
Militia during the War of 1812, and later Surveyor General of the public lands of Ohio, Indiana and Michigan,
whom he had known from boyhood in Kentucky. In the meantime he had acquired considerable bodies of land on
Todd's Creek, in the adjoining county of Warren, where his business of surveying frequently led him. One tract
of two thousand acres lay not far from the present town of Clarkesville, Clinton Co., where he built a blockhouse
for the protection of his surveying party. A few miles below this, on the left bank of the Little Miami River, in
Warren Co., he had a smaller tract on which he lived for a short time when he purchased the well-known farm
lying on the north east corner of the crossing of the Waynesville and Morrow, and the Lebanon and Fort Ancient
pikes, one and a half miles west of the last named place, and now occupied by Cephas Gutterry. Here he lived for
many years and until his removal to Indiana. Judge Owen Todd was one of the notabilities of the "Miami
Country".
In person, he was five feet, ten inches in height, compact and muscular and weighed about one hundred and
sixty pounds. His bodily activity and powers of endurance were remarkable, and incredible stories are told of his
leaping and other athletic feats. His complexion was far and his head, which was large, was covered with dark
brown hair that hung to his waist, but which he wore as a queue, put up in a silk or leather bag. The queue was
cut off a short time before his death and is now (1883) in possession of his granddaughter, Miss Jane Todd, of
Chattanooga, Tenn... He was a man of great courage; indeed, it may be said of him that he was utterly without
fear. In his affections he was warm and demonstrative. To his wife and children and other near relatives, he was
charmingly tender and gracious. Another of his children, Mrs. Madison, says of him that he never left home for
the shortest time without kissing his wife farewell. He was confiding and generous to weakness. His willingness
to serve his friends gave him much trouble in his later days, dissipating the ample earnings of a lifetime and
bringing him almost to the verge of bankruptcy.
Though a slave owner while living in Kentucky he was always an advocate of the abolition of slavery, and
before leaving that state he gave freedom to all his slaves, about fifteen in number. Seven or eight of these
refused to be left behind and were taken to Ohio, where their wants were well supplied, all the women receiving
twenty acres of land on their marriage.
Though descended on the paternal side through a long line of Presbyterians he early attached himself to the
Methodist Church, as did his wife, and died in the communion. Early in 1817, he followed some of his children
to Vevay, Indiana, buying a farm two miles below the town on the banks of the Ohio River, and died the same
year, at his town home, the site of which is now occupied by a Baptist Church. He is buried in the Vevay
Cemetery, where a stone with suitable inscription marks his grave. He was eloquent of speech, but was not
ambitious of political distinction and never sought office, yet during his short life he filled many places of honor,
and it is not known that he ever betrayed a public or private trust.
Judge Todd married (1) in 1782, his cousin, Elizabeth Smith, who died in 1783, and had one child, Hannah,
who married Mordecai Redd. He married (2) June 9, 1790, Maria Jane Paxton, born April 22, 1771, died at
Madison, Ind, in 1834. She was the daughter of Col. Thomas Paxton, then living on the North Fork of Elkhorn
Creek. Colonel Paxton removed from Bedford Co., PA to Fayette Co. KY in 1789. In 1776 he was a captain in
the Bedford County Militia, and commanded a company in active service from Sept. 12 to Nov 13, 1776. In
1794, he commanded the scouts in advance of the movements of Gen. Wayne's army that resulted in the battle of
Fallen Timbers. Mrs. Todd was buried in the "old graveyard" at Madison but the place of her sepulchure is
unknown, her tombstone having disappeared...
More About MARIA JANE PAXTON:
Burial: "Old Graveyard" in Madison, IN
9
Child of OWEN TODD and ELIZABETH SMITH is:
i. HANNAH6 TODD, b. 1783; d. 1876; m. MORDECAI REDD.
Children of OWEN TODD and MARIA PAXTON are:
10. ii. OWEN KENTUCKY6 TODD, b. 23 October 1791, Cane Run, Fayette Co. KY; d. 1864, Barry Co. MO.
iii. MARIA JANE TODD, b. 1793; d. 1880; m. CHANNING MADISON, 1814.
iv. PAXTON WARREN TODD, b. 1795; d. 1837; m. MARTHA FELTER.
v. ROBERT WILLIAM TODD, b. 1797, Pa; m. CATHERINE MCCULLY.
vi. DAVID ANDREW TODD, b. 1799; d. 1864; m. MARY OGLE.
vii. JOHN HAWKINS TODD, b. 14 October 1801, Clermont Co. OH; d. 1824, Vevay, IN.
Notes for JOHN HAWKINS TODD:
Died unmarried.
viii. ISABELLA RAMSEY TODD, b. 1803; d. 1879; m. ABRAHAM DUMONT.
ix. NANCY SMITH TODD, b. 1805; d. 1831; m. SIMON S. GILLETT.
x. LEVI WESLEY TODD, b. 1807; m. DEMIA BUTLER.
xi. ELIZA JANE TODD, b. 1809; d. 1863; m. WILLIAM PEYTON STEVENS.
Notes for WILLIAM PEYTON STEVENS:
Have also found his last name listed as Stephens
11. xii. ELIJAH SMITH TODD, b. 06 July 1811, Warren Co. OH; d. 1864, Wright Co. MO.
6. HANNAH5 TODD (DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 11 January 1765 in Montgomery Co.
PA, and died 19 September 1822 in Georgetown, Scott Co., KY. She married (1) ELIJAH SMITH 18 June 1782.
He was born Abt. 1761 in Philadelphia, PA. She married (2) JAMES KELLEY Aft. 1801. He was born Abt. 1761
in Philadelphia, PA.
Notes for HANNAH TODD:
Hannah's first husband, Elijah Smith, was supposed to be her cousin, with whom she removed from montgomery
Co., PA., and lived at Walnut Hills, near Lexington, in the town. It is said that he had the first shingle roof in
Lexington on his house.
Notes for ELIJAH SMITH:
Elijah Smith was supposed to be Hannah Todd's cousin, with whom she removed from Montgomery Co. PA and
lived at Walnut Hills, near Lexington, and in the town. It is said that he had the first shingle roof in Lexington on
his house.
Children of HANNAH TODD and ELIJAH SMITH are:
i. ELIZABETH6 SMITH, b. 16 June 1783, Montgomery Co. PA.
ii. NANCY ANN SMITH, b. 25 January 1786, Fayette Co., KY.
iii. DAVID TODD SMITH, b. 23 May 1791, Montgomery Co. PA.
iv. SUSANNA SMITH, b. 23 May 1791, Montgomery Co. PA.
v. JOHN TODD SMITH, b. 25 June 1793, Montgomery Co. PA.
vi. HANNAH SMITH, b. 23 May 1796, Montgomery Co. PA.
vii. LEVI TODD SMITH, b. 27 May 1798, Montgomery Co. PA.
viii. MARY JANE SMITH, b. 03 June 1800, Montgomery Co. PA.
Generation No. 3
7. MARY6 TODD (JOHN5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born Aft. 1780. She married (1) JAMES
RUSSELL. She married (2) ROBERT WICKLIFFE, SR..
Child of MARY TODD and JAMES RUSSELL is:
i. COL. JOHN TODD7 RUSSELL.
Notes for COL. JOHN TODD RUSSELL:
Died at age 20.
10
8. DOCTOR JOHN6 TODD (LEVI5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 27 April 1787 in
Lexington, Fayette Co., KY. He married ELIZABETH SMITH.
Children of JOHN TODD and ELIZABETH SMITH are:
i. LIZZIE7 TODD.
ii. FRANCIE TODD.
9. ROBERT SMITH6 TODD (LEVI5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 25 February 1791 in
Harrodsburg, KY, and died 15 July 1849 in Springfield, Sangamon, IL. He married (1) ELIZA ANN PARKER. She
was born Abt. 1794 in Lexington, Fayette Co., KY, and died 06 July 1825 in Lexington, Fayette Co., KY. He
married (2) ELIZABETH HUMPHRIES, daughter of ALEXANDER HUMPHRIES and MARY BROWN.
Notes for ROBERT SMITH TODD:
These children of Robert Smith Todd from Daughters of the American Revolution Magazine, Vol. 59, No. 5
(May 1925), p. 313
All of his sons except George died Civil War.
Notes for ELIZA ANN PARKER:
She died from child birth of Georgie. She was "bled" to get the sickness out, and it killed her. Mary was only 6
yrs. old.
Children of ROBERT TODD and ELIZA PARKER are:
i. ROBERT PARKER7 TODD, d. Died young. Not positive if Eliza or Betsy was mother..
ii. ELIZABETH P. TODD, b. Abt. 1813, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY; m. NINIAN WIRT EDWARDS.
iii. FRANCES ANN TODD, b. Abt. 1814; m. WILLIAM WALLACE.
iv. ANN TODD, b. Abt. 1816; m. CLARK MOULTON SMITH.
12. v. MARY ANN TODD, b. 13 December 1818, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY; d. 16 July 1882, Springfield,
Sangamon, IL.
vi. LEVI TODD, b. Abt. 1821; d. Civil War, KY, prob. of starvation or drink; m. LOUISA SEARLES.
Notes for LEVI TODD:
Civil War, Union. Died destitute. Union sympathizer.
vii. DR. GEORGE ROGERS CLARK TODD, b. Abt. 1824.
Notes for DR. GEORGE ROGERS CLARK TODD:
Had daughters and a son, George Rogers Clark, Jr. Simply disappeared into the South. (Father or son
disappeared into South?).
Dr. George Rogers Clark Todd is buried in the Quaker Cemetery, Camden, SC.
More About DR. GEORGE ROGERS CLARK TODD:
Burial: Quaker Cem., Camden, SC
Children of ROBERT TODD and ELIZABETH HUMPHRIES are:
viii. MARGARET7 TODD, m. CHARLES HENRY KELLOGG.
ix. SAM TODD, d. Civil War.
Notes for SAM TODD:
Fought for the Confederacy.
x. DAVID TODD, b. Abt. 1826.
Notes for DAVID TODD:
Fought for the Confederacy.
xi. MARTHA TODD.
13. xii. EMILIE TODD.
xiii. ALEC TODD, b. 1839; d. Civil War.
11
Notes for ALEC TODD:
Confederacy. Killed New Orleans.
xiv. ELODIE TODD, m. NATHANIAL HENRY RHODES DAUSON.
xv. KATHERINE TODD.
10. OWEN KENTUCKY6 TODD (OWEN5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 23 October 1791 in
Cane Run, Fayette Co. KY, and died 1864 in Barry Co. MO. He married (1) ELIZABETH COCHRAN 1815. He
married (2) SARAH FELTER 1818, daughter of JACOB FELTER. She was born Abt. 1802 in Cincinnati, Hamilton,
OH, and died in Barry Co. MO.
Notes for OWEN KENTUCKY TODD:
Owen and his second wife, Sarah, came to Ark. around 1830, possibly to Mississippi Co. According to census
records, they were living in MO around 1840. In 1850 they are back in Ark., in Washington Co., not far from
Owen's brother Elijah Smith Todd. Killed in Mo during Civil War by Federal troops while defending his
relatives, which were members of the troop.
Children of OWEN TODD and SARAH FELTER are:
i. MARTHA7 TODD, b. 1822, near Lexington, Fayette, KY; d. Aft. 1850; m. ELIJAH S. TODD.
14. ii. SUSANNAH TODD, b. 1824; d. 1892, Washington Co. AR.
iii. ELIZA (ELIZABETH) TODD, b. 1826; m. WILLIAM CLEMENTS.
Notes for WILLIAM CLEMENTS:
Have found William's name spelled Clements/ Clemmons/ Clemens.
15. iv. ZERELDA TODD, b. February 1828, AR; d. 1922, Pontiac, MO.
v. JANE TODD, b. 01 December 1830, AR; m. ALBERT JOHNSON, 01 December 1853; b. Abt. 1836, AR.
vi. MARIA TODD, b. 1832, AR; d. Died young.
vii. OWEN WARREN TODD, b. 1834, AR; d. July 1864, Civil War. MO.
viii. ISABELLA TODD, b. 1836, AR; d. 1881; m. JEFFERSON HUDSON, 1860, Barry Co. MO.
ix. VICTORIA TODD, b. 1838, MO; m. CHARLES CRABTREE.
x. ELIJAH SMITH TODD, b. 1840, MO; d. July 1864, Civil War. Barry Co. MO.
xi. WILLIAM PAXTON TODD, b. 1842; d. Died young.
11. ELIJAH SMITH6 TODD (OWEN5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 06 July 1811 in Warren
Co. OH, and died 1864 in Wright Co. MO. He married MARTHA HARDIN BOYD 31 May 1832.
Notes for ELIJAH SMITH TODD:
He may have married before this or there is an error in some date. The oldest child was born 3 Oct 1830 TN, says
the 1850 census. Of their 12 children, all but the first one was born in AR.
Children of ELIJAH TODD and MARTHA BOYD are:
i. JULIA ANN7 TODD, b. 03 October 1830, TN; d. 13 July 1851; m. GEORGE HANCOCK.
ii. NANCY J. TODD, b. 15 March 1833, AR; d. 28 January 1847.
iii. WILLIAM S. TODD, b. 10 January 1835, AR; d. 20 September 1835.
iv. MARTHA L. TODD, b. 06 June 1837, AR; d. 16 May 1861; m. JACOB L. DAVIS.
v. JOHN PAXTON TODD, b. 17 December 1838, AR; d. 08 March 1860; m. (1) PERNINA JANE DAVIS; m. (2)
EMILY MORRISON.
vi. MARGARET L. TODD, b. 09 December 1840, AR; d. 30 October 1864; m. WILLIAM BELLOWS.
vii. JOSEPHINE L. TODD, b. 31 March 1843, AR; d. 07 September 1876; m. JAMES KILBURN.
viii. MARY M. TODD, b. 27 November 1844, AR; m. JOHN T. RANDOLPH.
ix. SARAH D. TODD, b. 27 November 1844, AR; d. 18 April 1867; m. KENNETH M. DAVIS.
x. WILLIS M. TODD, b. 01 February 1847, AR; d. 13 October 1867; m. HANNAH M. LOWERY.
16. xi. ANN ELIZA TODD, b. 06 February 1849, AR; d. 30 October 1939.
xii. PERNECIA TODD, b. 08 January 1852, AR; d. 24 December 1868; m. ZACHARIAH TAYLOR.
Generation No. 4
12. MARY ANN7 TODD (ROBERT SMITH6, LEVI5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 13
December 1818 in Lexington, Fayette Co., KY, and died 16 July 1882 in Springfield, Sangamon, IL. She married
12
ABRAHAM LINCOLN 04 November 1842 in Springfield, IL, son of THOMAS LINCOLN and NANCY HANKS. He was
born 12 February 1809 in Hardin Co. KY, and died 15 April 1865 in Washington, D.C..
Notes for MARY ANN TODD:
She met Abraham Lincoln while living at the home of her sister, Elizabeth, wife of Ninian Edwards at Springfield,
Il. His courting Mary was discouraged by them because they considered him below her social position. They
broke up Jan 1841 and he pursued at least two other young ladies. They were married on a half-day's notice, Nov.
4, 1842, when Mary was a month shy of 24 yrs. old, at the home of her sister. Her wedding band from Abe was
inscribed "A.L. to M.T., Nov 4, 1842, Love Is Eternal".
Robert had her taken into court and declared insane May 19, 1875, and she was put into Bellevue Place, an insane
asylum. She was undoubtedly eccentric, but was she really insane? She was subject to wild and abrupt moodswings,
starting in childhood. She had a horrendous and perhaps hysterical temper. It is generally held now that
she was bipolar. Some have even suggested untreated diabetes as well. After the death of three of her children,
having her husband's brains blown out while sitting beside her, and later having the Chicago Fire come within
three blocks of her home less than 90 days after the loss of her beloved son -- she was if nothing else a candidate
for serious therapy. She was released from the asylum three months later, against objections of her son Robert,
and went to live with her sister Elizabeth again. In Illinois it took one year to be claimed recovered from mental
illness. On June 15, 1876, the Chicago court reversed it's decision and declared Mary Todd Lincoln sane. She
left Springfield in September, traveling to New York with her grt. nephew Lewis Baker and then to Europe. For
four yrs. she lived there alone in Pau, a town at the foot of the French Pyrenees. She then traveled to Italy and
southern France. In 1880, her health and eyesight failing, Mary returned to Springfield, where she lived as a semiinvalid
on four rooms of Elizabeth's house. She used two rooms to store her sixty-four trunks. When President
Garfield was assassinated in 1881and his widow given a small pension, she assembled helpers and rushed to
Washington to demand parity, which she got, plus back payments, plus interest. She collapsed on the eleventh
anniversary of Tad's death -- July 15, 1882 -- and died of a stroke the following day. She was buried with Willie,
Eddie, Tad, and Abe in Springfield.
More About MARY ANN TODD:
Burial: Oak Ridge Cem., Springfield, Sangamon, IL
Notes for ABRAHAM LINCOLN:
President Abraham Lincoln was born 12 Feb 1809 at Sinking Spring Farm, (larue), KY. He was shot at the Ford
Theater, by John Wilkes Booth. where he and Mary were attending the play "Our American Cousin". He was
taken across the street to the Peterson Boarding House, 516 10th St. NW, Washington, DC, where he died at 7:22
a.m., April 15. He is buried in Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Ill.
(Research from Ancestry.com) Many believe that Abraham's real father was Abraham Enloe, who stood over 6 ft.
tall, with dark eyes and hair. Enloe, of Rutherford Co., NC, was the owner of a large amount of land, and also the
father of 16 children. Abraham Lincoln's mother, Nancy Hanks had been bound out for raising with the Enloes.
Enloe arranged for a man named Michael Tanner (believed to be Nancy's father) to bring Nancy and little Abe
back to Oconoluffte, where enloe came up with a solution to his predicament. Enloe arranged for an illiterate and
shiftless sawmill worker named Tom Lincoln to marry Nancy and to provide her and the baby a new home in
Kentucky. It is said that Enloe gave Lincoln a pretty good sum of money, a set of mules and a wagon and set
them in the direction of Kentucky. A Methodist minister named Jesse Head, married Tom and Nancy in 1806. It
is said that the minister testified that the Lincolns left their wedding with a little black headed boy. Abraham
Lincoln reportedly confided in a friend that his right name was Enloe but that he had always gone by the name of
his step-father.
More About ABRAHAM LINCOLN:
Burial: 04 May 1865, Oak Ridge Cem., Springfield, Sangamon, IL
Children of MARY TODD and ABRAHAM LINCOLN are:
17. i. ROBERT TODD8 LINCOLN, b. 01 August 1843, Springfield, Il; d. 25 July 1926, Manchester, VT.
ii. EDWARD BAKER LINCOLN, b. 10 March 1846, Springfield, Il; d. 01 February 1850, Springfield, Il.
Notes for EDWARD BAKER LINCOLN:
The first of the Todd children to die. He was sickly all of his life.
iii. WILLIAM WALLACE LINCOLN, b. 21 December 1850, Springfield, Il; d. 20 February 1862, White House,
13
Washington, D.C..
Notes for WILLIAM WALLACE LINCOLN:
Willie got typhoid fever, then his brother Tad got it. Willie died from it.
iv. THOMAS "TAD" LINCOLN, b. 04 April 1853, Springfield, Il; d. 14 July 1871, Chicago, Il.
Notes for THOMAS "TAD" LINCOLN:
Named Thomas after Abe's father. Abe said he looked like a tadpole, long and slim with a big head, so he
called him "Tad". He always spoke with a lisp, and couldn't learn very well from his tutors. After Abe died,
Mary took him to Europe, where he was tutored and improved much. When they returned to America three
yrs. later, Tad caught a cold on the ship and never got over it. Died of consumption (?) July 1871, at the age
of 18. Another source gives his date of death as July 15, of tuberculosis.
13. EMILIE7 TODD (ROBERT SMITH6, LEVI5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) She married BENJAMIN
HARDIN HELMES. He died in Civil War.
Notes for EMILIE TODD:
Emilie had 3 children. She was pregnant with her 3rd when he husband was killed in CW.
Notes for BENJAMIN HARDIN HELMES:
Killed at Chickamauga Creek. Confederacy. Emilie was pregnant with their 3rd child when he died.
Child of EMILIE TODD and BENJAMIN HELMES is:
i. KATHERINE8 HELMES.
14. SUSANNAH7 TODD (OWEN KENTUCKY6, OWEN5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 1824,
and died 1892 in Washington Co. AR. She married ISAAC JOHNSON 13 August 1843 in Barry Co. MO. He was
born 18 March 1822 in TN, and died 08 September 1865 in Civil War. Barry Co. MO.
Notes for SUSANNAH TODD:
Prob. born in McNairy, TN. LDS records say KY. Census records list MO.
More About SUSANNAH TODD:
Burial: Joyce Cem., Washington Co. AR
More About ISAAC JOHNSON:
Burial: Bramhall Cem., Grove Spring, MO
Children of SUSANNAH TODD and ISAAC JOHNSON are:
i. WILLIAM OWEN8 JOHNSON, b. 15 May 1844, Barry Co. Mo; d. 11 May 1924; m. MARGARET JANE DAVIS,
19 January 1865, Wright Co. MO.
More About WILLIAM OWEN JOHNSON:
Burial: Round Mtn. Cem., Washington Co. AR
ii. NANCY JANE JOHNSON, b. 07 January 1847, Washington Co. AR; d. 26 June 1937, Washington Co. AR; m.
(1) JOHN GARRETT; m. (2) THOMAS OVERTON; b. October 1836, TN; d. 1900, Washington Co. AR.
More About NANCY JANE JOHNSON:
Burial: Joyce Cem., Washington Co. AR
More About THOMAS OVERTON:
Burial: Joyce Cem., Washington Co. AR
iii. SOLOMON ISAIAH JOHNSON, b. 1849; m. MARGARET ELIZABETH KELLER.
iv. ELIZA JANE JOHNSON, b. 22 October 1852, Washington Co. AR; d. 06 November 1930; m. (1) JAMES
GRAHAM; m. (2) WILLIAM THOMAS HARRIS, Springvalley, Washington Co. AR.
More About ELIZA JANE JOHNSON:
Burial: Molly Field, Cherokee Co. OK
14
v. ZURELDA JOHNSON, b. 04 January 1854, AR; d. 09 August 1912; m. (1) BEN JOHNSON; m. (2) ZACHARY
TAYLOR RYAN.
vi. MARTHA DELILAH JOHNSON, b. 29 June 1856, AR; d. 31 August 1946, AR; m. ELISHA LANE CLOER.
vii. JOHN T. JOHNSON, b. 1859.
viii. SARAH JOHNSON, b. 13 April 1861, AR; d. 15 May 1934; m. JOHN ALLEN REYNOLDS.
More About SARAH JOHNSON:
Burial: Joyce Cem., Washington Co. AR
ix. MICAJAH JOHNSON, b. 29 July 1864, AR; d. 04 October 1952; m. (1) EMILY JANE JOHNSON; m. (2)
SARAH ELIZABETH CLOER.
More About MICAJAH JOHNSON:
Burial: Joyce Cem., Washington Co. AR
15. ZERELDA7 TODD (OWEN KENTUCKY6, OWEN5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born February
1828 in AR, and died 1922 in Pontiac, MO. She married SOLOMON F. JOHNSON 20 July 1849 in Washington Co.
AR, son of JOHN JOHNSON and NANCY WHITELEY. He was born 1827 in White Co. TN, and died 07 February
1908 in Wright Co. MO.
More About ZERELDA TODD:
Burial: Turnbo Cem., Pontiac, MO
More About SOLOMON F. JOHNSON:
Burial: Bramhall Cem., Grove Spring, MO
Children of ZERELDA TODD and SOLOMON JOHNSON are:
i. JOHN8 JOHNSON, b. 1853, AR; d. 04 November 1891; m. MARY.
Notes for JOHN JOHNSON:
Killed by his father.
18. ii. SARAH JANE JOHNSON, b. 30 July 1852, AR; d. 24 September 1925.
iii. ISABELLE JOHNSON, b. 1854, AR; m. DAVID DURBIN.
19. iv. WILLIAM JOHNSON, b. 1858, AR; d. 12 December 1946.
v. NANCY JOHNSON, b. 25 December 1859, AR; d. 02 June 1907; m. (UNKNOWN) HUDDLESTON.
20. vi. ELIZABETH JOHNSON, b. 1863, AR; d. 1943.
vii. D. W. JOHNSON, b. 14 June 1862; d. 25 June 1862.
More About D. W. JOHNSON:
Burial: Bramhall Cem., Grove Spring, MO
viii. JULIA JOHNSON, b. 14 January 1865, AR; d. 16 April 1888; m. HENRY WINTERS.
More About JULIA JOHNSON:
Burial: Bramhall Cem., Grove Spring, MO
21. ix. SAMUEL JOHNSON, b. 1869, AR; d. 10 August 1945.
x. BENTON JOHNSON.
22. xi. MARY MOLLIE JANE JOHNSON, b. 02 April 1873; d. 04 November 1921.
xii. ELIZA JOHNSON.
16. ANN ELIZA7 TODD (ELIJAH SMITH6, OWEN5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 06 February
1849 in AR, and died 30 October 1939. She married WILLIAM BURGESS 30 October 1867, son of JOHN BURGESS
and MARY GASS. He was born 27 September 1849, and died 06 October 1917.
Notes for ANN ELIZA TODD:
In early 1888 William Burgess and Ann Eliza Todd, his wife and their six children, and also John Burgess and his
wife Sarah and their children went west. They settled in Douglas Co. Washington.
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Notes for WILLIAM BURGESS:
For family line of Burgess, see Washington County History, page 1418
Children of ANN TODD and WILLIAM BURGESS are:
i. MARTHA MANERVA8 BURGESS, b. 1868.
ii. NANCY JANE BURGESS, b. 1870.
iii. MARY LUCINDA BURGESS, b. 1872.
iv. SARAH MARGARET BURGESS, b. 1874.
v. MALISA CATHARINE BURGESS, b. 1876.
vi. JOHN HENRY BURGESS, b. 1879.
vii. OMAR ALBERT BURGESS, b. 1890, Dayton, Washington.
Generation No. 5
17. ROBERT TODD8 LINCOLN (MARY ANN7 TODD, ROBERT SMITH6, LEVI5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2,
JAMES1) was born 01 August 1843 in Springfield, Il, and died 25 July 1926 in Manchester, VT. He married
MARY EUNICE HARLAN 24 September 1868 in Washington DC, daughter of HARLAN and ANN PECK. She was
born 1846, and died 31 March 1937.
Notes for ROBERT TODD LINCOLN:
Robert became a lawyer. When he was born he had one eye that was cocked. When he was young, a doctor
performed surgery on it and it became corrected over time. He joined the Union army early 1865, for the staff of
General Grant, and made Captain within a month. He was always embarassed by his mother, and had her
declared insane and put into an asylum. She was able to get out, with the help of friends, and much against the
wishes of Robert, and went to live with her sister Elizabeth in Springfield. The court reversed it's decision after
one year and declared that she was not insane.
He lived to be eighty-three, serving as President of the Pullman Company and dying a millionare. He was
Secretary of War to James Garfield and Chester A. Arthur. His objections and obstructions about sending
support to the Greeley Polar Expedition of 1884 have been blamed for the disaster that overtook the explorers.
From 1889 to 1893 he was the U.S. Minister to Great Britain.
In 1881, Robert was among President Garfielld's party at the train-station when Garfield was shot, and was
present at the President's deathbed. In 1901 he happened to be in the crowd at the Pan-American Exposition in
Buffalo when President William McKinley was shot. Thereafter he refused all invitation to the White House or to
any occasion on which he would be in the same room as the President of the United States. He burned some of
his father's papers and put others under seal not to be opened until twenty-one years after his own death. He died
in 1926, and in keeping with his desire to be perceived as a man in his own right and not as Abraham Lincoln's
son, is buried in Arlington National Cemetery, on the hillside just below Robert E. Lee's house.
More About ROBERT TODD LINCOLN:
Burial: Arlington Nat. Cem., Arlington, VA
Notes for MARY EUNICE HARLAN:
Her father was a Senator from Iowa.
Children of ROBERT LINCOLN and MARY HARLAN are:
23. i. MARY (CALLED MAMIE)9 LINCOLN, b. 15 October 1869; d. 21 November 1938.
ii. ABRAHAM "JACK" LINCOLN, b. 14 August 1873; d. 05 March 1890, London, England.
Notes for ABRAHAM "JACK" LINCOLN:
Had no children.
24. iii. JESSIE LINCOLN, b. 06 November 1875; d. 04 January 1948.
18. SARAH JANE8 JOHNSON (ZERELDA7 TODD, OWEN KENTUCKY6, OWEN5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2,
JAMES1) was born 30 July 1852 in AR, and died 24 September 1925. She married JAMES BUTTRAM.
More About SARAH JANE JOHNSON:
Burial: Little Vine Cem., Grove Spring, MO
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Children of SARAH JOHNSON and JAMES BUTTRAM are:
i. ZERELDA9 BUTTRAM, m. HUGH GUINN.
ii. FRANK BUTTRAM, b. 1878; m. LULU PETET.
iii. MARY BUTTRAM, b. 1880; m. HUNDLEY GUINN.
iv. JOSEPH BUTTRAM.
25. v. ABRAHAM BUTTRAM, b. 1884.
19. WILLIAM8 JOHNSON (ZERELDA7 TODD, OWEN KENTUCKY6, OWEN5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1)
was born 1858 in AR, and died 12 December 1946. He married (1) HANNAH DURBIN. He married (2) MINNIE
EMERSON.
More About WILLIAM JOHNSON:
Burial: Oak Hill Cem., Carthage, MO
Children of WILLIAM JOHNSON and HANNAH DURBIN are:
i. JOHN9 JOHNSON, m. LOTTIE.
ii. WILLIAM JOHNSON, m. DONNIE LOWERY.
iii. MARY JOHNSON, m. WILLIAM LANGSTON.
iv. JEFFERSON JOHNSON.
v. DAVID JOHNSON, m. HATTIE PURCE.
vi. HOSEA JOHNSON.
Notes for HOSEA JOHNSON:
Do not know if this is a male or female name.
vii. FLOYD JOHNSON.
Children of WILLIAM JOHNSON and MINNIE EMERSON are:
viii. LENA9 JOHNSON.
ix. HOMER JOHNSON, m. ELLA WYNNE.
x. BERTHA JOHNSON, m. (1) EDGAR GOSWILL; m. (2) (UNKNOWN) BUSH.
xi. FRED JOHNSON.
xii. ROY JOHNSON.
xiii. VERDA JOHNSON.
xiv. WALTER JOHNSON.
xv. CORBETT JOHNSON.
xvi. VULA JOHNSON.
xvii. SHIRL JOHNSON.
xviii. MORRIS JOHNSON.
20. ELIZABETH8 JOHNSON (ZERELDA7 TODD, OWEN KENTUCKY6, OWEN5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2,
JAMES1) was born 1863 in AR, and died 1943. She married ENOCH O'DELL.
More About ELIZABETH JOHNSON:
Burial: Bramhall Cem., Grove Spring, MO
Children of ELIZABETH JOHNSON and ENOCH O'DELL are:
i. JEFFERSON9 O'DELL, m. PEARL.
ii. SAMUEL O'DELL, m. GUSTA SHADY.
iii. LANTA O'DELL, m. PERRY WEAVER.
iv. LETHA O'DELL, m. (UNKNOWN) CARLTON.
v. LAURA O'DELL, m. FLOYD WEBB.
vi. ENOCH O'DELL, m. GENEVIEVE PETET.
vii. MINNIE O'DELL, m. RAY DAVIS.
viii. DOCIA O'DELL, m. (1) ARVELL HIGHTOWER; m. (2) (UNKNOWN) BOSSE.
ix. DAVID O'DELL.
x. WILLIAM O'DELL.
xi. FRANK O'DELL.
xii. JAKE O'DELL, m. STELLA DANIELS.
xiii. ELMER O'DELL.
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xiv. GRACE O'DELL, m. JESSE MCNEALY.
xv. GUSTA O'DELL, m. LESTER DECKARK.
21. SAMUEL8 JOHNSON (ZERELDA7 TODD, OWEN KENTUCKY6, OWEN5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1)
was born 1869 in AR, and died 10 August 1945. He married (1) PHOEBE. He married (2) MAGGIE EMMERSON.
More About SAMUEL JOHNSON:
Burial: Tumbo Cem., Pontiac, MO
Children of SAMUEL JOHNSON and PHOEBE are:
i. WADE9 JOHNSON.
ii. ELIZA JOHNSON.
iii. DOVA JOHNSON.
22. MARY MOLLIE JANE8 JOHNSON (ZERELDA7 TODD, OWEN KENTUCKY6, OWEN5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3,
JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 02 April 1873, and died 04 November 1921. She married THOMAS R. KENDRICK 03
April 1891.
Children of MARY JOHNSON and THOMAS KENDRICK are:
26. i. CLAUDE H.9 KENDRICK.
ii. JOSEPH KENDRICK, m. JEWELL J. SANDLIN.
iii. S. ELIZABETH KENDRICK, m. JOHN W. KNIGHT.
iv. BERTHA KENDRICK.
v. JAMES KENDRICK.
vi. MAUD J. KENDRICK, m. W. BEN HASTON.
vii. VIRGIL KENDRICK.
viii. OWEN D. KENDRICK, m. ETHEL HASTON.
ix. DORA L. KENDRICK, m. AFTON S. HILL.
x. ETHEL M. KENDRICK, m. F. C. MCGINNIS.
xi. ELMER L. KENDRICK, m. VELMA L. ASH.
Generation No. 6
23. MARY (CALLED MAMIE)9 LINCOLN (ROBERT TODD8, MARY ANN7 TODD, ROBERT SMITH6, LEVI5, DAVID
ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 15 October 1869, and died 21 November 1938. She married
CHARLES ISHAM 02 September 1891. He was born 20 July, and died 08 June 1919.
Notes for MARY (CALLED MAMIE) LINCOLN:
Named Mary, but went by Mamie. Her date of birth, or that of her son Lincoln has to be in error. Abraham lived
1873-1890. He mother would have been younger than 13 when he was born. He had no children.
Child of MARY LINCOLN and CHARLES ISHAM is:
i. LINCOLN10 ISHAM, b. 09 June 1892; d. September 1971; m. TELHOMA CORREA.
24. JESSIE9 LINCOLN (ROBERT TODD8, MARY ANN7 TODD, ROBERT SMITH6, LEVI5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3,
JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 06 November 1875, and died 04 January 1948. She married (1) WARREN BECKWITH.
She married (2) FRANK EDWARD. She married (3) ROBERT J. RANDOLF.
Children of JESSIE LINCOLN and WARREN BECKWITH are:
i. MARY LINCOLN "PEGGY"10 BECKWITH, b. 22 August 1898.
Notes for MARY LINCOLN "PEGGY" BECKWITH:
Had no children.
ii. ROBERT TODD LINCOLN BECKWITH, b. 19 July 1904; d. 24 December 1985; m. (1) HAZEL HOLLAND
WILSON; m. (2) ANNAMARIE HOFFMAN; m. (3) MARGARET FRISTOE.
Notes for ROBERT TODD LINCOLN BECKWITH:
Called "Bud". Had no children.
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25. ABRAHAM9 BUTTRAM (SARAH JANE8 JOHNSON, ZERELDA7 TODD, OWEN KENTUCKY6, OWEN5, DAVID ANDREW4,
ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) was born 1884. He married ELLA BURRELL.
Child of ABRAHAM BUTTRAM and ELLA BURRELL is:
27. i. LOLA WAVE10 BUTTRAM.
26. CLAUDE H.9 KENDRICK (MARY MOLLIE JANE8 JOHNSON, ZERELDA7 TODD, OWEN KENTUCKY6, OWEN5, DAVID
ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) He married ETHEL DECKARD.
Child of CLAUDE KENDRICK and ETHEL DECKARD is:
28. i. THOMAS10 KENDRICK.
Generation No. 7
27. LOLA WAVE10 BUTTRAM (ABRAHAM9, SARAH JANE8 JOHNSON, ZERELDA7 TODD, OWEN KENTUCKY6, OWEN5,
DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1) She married FRED WALLACE JOHNSON.
Children of LOLA BUTTRAM and FRED JOHNSON are:
i. DOIL WILSON11 JOHNSON, m. JANET BLAIR.
ii. JOYCE ELAIN JOHNSON.
iii. WANDA MAY JOHNSON.
iv. LOREN WILLIAM JOHNSON.
v. KAREN MARIE JOHNSON.
vi. SHARON KATHERINE JOHNSON.
28. THOMAS10 KENDRICK (CLAUDE H.9, MARY MOLLIE JANE8 JOHNSON, ZERELDA7 TODD, OWEN KENTUCKY6,
OWEN5, DAVID ANDREW4, ROBERT3, JOHN2, JAMES1)
Child of THOMAS KENDRICK is:
i. DONNIE11 KENDRICK.

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